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La nueva amenaza sanitaria está aqui; surge agente biológico resistente a todos los antibióticos

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Febrero 3rd 2017, 23:39




'Superbug' resistant to all antibiotics killed Nevada woman
By HealthDay News | Jan. 13, 2017 at 3:30 PM Follow @upi
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FRIDAY, Jan. 13, 2017 -- A Nevada woman in her 70s who'd recently returned from India died in September from a "superbug" infection that resisted all antibiotics, according to a report released Friday.

The case raises concern about the spread of such infections, which have become more common over past decades as germs have developed resistance to widely used antibiotics.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention "basically reported that there was nothing in our medicine cabinet to treat this lady," report co-author Dr. Randall Todd told the Reno Gazette-Journal. He's director of epidemiology and public health preparedness for the Washoe County Health District, in Reno.

The report was published Jan. 13 in the CDC journal Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

As reported by Todd and his colleagues, the woman fractured her right leg while in India and underwent multiple hospitalizations in that country over two years. The last such hospitalization occurred in June.

She returned to the United States but was admitted to the Reno-area hospital on Aug. 18 with a severe inflammatory reaction to an infection in her right hip.

On Aug. 19, doctors isolated a sample of a known antibiotic-resistant "superbug" -- known as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) -- from the patient.

CDC testing subsequently revealed the germ was New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM) -- a highly resistant form of CRE typically found outside the United States.

"Antimicrobial susceptibility testing in the United States indicated that the isolate was resistant to 26 antibiotics," the researchers reported. In effect, the germ "was resistant to all available antimicrobial drugs," they said.

As soon as CRE was identified, "the patient was placed in a single room under contact precautions," Todd's group wrote. The woman later developed septic shock and died in early September.

The doctors say the case -- the first ever in Nevada -- highlights the fact that patients treated in hospitals in other countries can acquire these extremely dangerous infections.

"The patient in this report had inpatient health care exposure in India before receiving care in the United States," the team noted. In such cases, U.S. health care facilities "should obtain a history of health care exposures outside their region upon admission and consider screening for CRE," they said.

Dr. Lei Chen is epidemiologist program manager for the health district, and a co-author of the new report.

She told the Reno Gazette-Journal that it's always possible that staff at a foreign hospital "don't do a good infection control, or they don't have good hygiene, and it could be spread."

Todd said other patients in the same unit at the Reno hospital were also tested for the infection, but none tested positive.

"Had any of the other patients been infected with this, they would have had the same resistance," he said. "This is kind of scary stuff, and that's why we jump on things like this very quickly. We were pleased that the hospital responded as quickly and comprehensively as they did."

Both doctors stressed that the growing problem of antibiotic-resistant germs is caused by the overuse of these drugs -- often for conditions for which they are useless.

For example, people will often ask for an antibiotic for a cold or flu, which are caused by viruses. Antibiotics target bacteria, not viruses.

"Even if you're able to talk your doctor into prescribing them, and many people are able to do that, that is not going to help your cold or the flu in any way, shape or form," Todd said.
More information

There's more on antibiotic resistance at the World Health Organization.

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2017/01/13/Superbug-resistant-to-all-antibiotics-killed-Nevada-woman/9971484339059/

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"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
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Re: La nueva amenaza sanitaria está aqui; surge agente biológico resistente a todos los antibióticos

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Febrero 3rd 2017, 23:40



A woman died from a superbug that outsmarted all 26 US antibiotics
The woman had been traveling and hospitalized in India before returning to Nevada.
Updated by Julia Belluz@juliaoftoronto Jan 13, 2017, 1:40pm EST

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A culture of Klebsiella pneumoniae, the drug-resistant type of CRE bacteria that killed a Nevada woman in September. LARRY MULVEHILL/Getty

If you had any doubts about the "nightmare" and "catastrophic threat" of antimicrobial resistance, take a look at this new field report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Nevada public health officials tell the story of a Washoe County resident who appeared at a Reno hospital in August 2016 with sepsis. Doctors found out that she was infected with a type of carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, superbug called Klebsiella pneumoniae and quickly put her in isolation. Tests showed that the bacterium, which spread throughout her body, was resistant to 26 different antibiotics — or every antibiotic available in the US.

In early September, the woman, who was in her 70s, developed septic shock and died.

What makes this case particularly alarming is that the infection probably didn’t originate in the US. The woman had spent significant amounts of time in India, and while there, was hospitalized on several occasions over two years for a femur fracture and later, bone infections.

India has a major superbug issue, particularly in its hospitals. The authors of the report suggest the patient may have picked up her infection while in hospital there.

No one else seems to have caught this superbug from the woman. But the authors say a lesson here is that health care workers in the US need to get a history of all the “health care exposures” from their patients with CRE and “consider screening for CRE when patients report recent exposure outside the United States or in regions of the United States known to have a higher incidence of CRE.”

This is a frightening story of a deadly bacterium doctors couldn’t control — and the real limits of our antibiotic arsenal. But it’s also a reminder of how tricky the superbug problem will be to solve without a lot of international collaboration.
Countries can’t solve the superbug problem alone

In recent years, antibiotic misuse has accelerated the natural process of bacterial resistance, rendering some antibiotics useless and causing experts to warn that we are at the "dawn of a post-antibiotic era" that amounts to a health threat on par with terrorism.

The US has its own serious problem with antibiotic-resistant infections: They’re associated with 23,000 deaths and 2 million illnesses every year. We’ve already seen a number of different ones — gonorrhea, CREs, strains of tuberculosis — no longer respond to any of the drugs we have.

Though these situations are still rare, experts have warned that they are likely to become more common in the near future. A recent report commissioned by the UK government contains an alarming prediction: By 2050, antimicrobial-resistant infections will kill 10 million people across the world — more than the current toll from cancer.

Without antibiotics that work, common medical procedures like hip operations, C-sections, or chemotherapy will become more dangerous, and some medical interventions — organ transplants, chemotherapy — would be impossible to survive. And it’s not just medicine: The modern agricultural practices that give us our abundant food supply also depend on these drugs.

But even if some countries or major players take action against superbugs, they won’t be able to fix the problem alone. To truly address this issue, we need a global plan. (Remember: Microbes travel as easily as people can hop on planes.) We also need sectors — from health, agriculture, and security — to work together.

Recently, there’s been more focus on antimicrobial resistance. In September, the UN convened a rare high-level meeting at the General Assembly to address superbugs. Health experts called it a major turning point and a potential boost for globally coordinated action. (You can read all about it here.)

But that meeting was more about galvanizing political attention and getting countries to commit to addressing the problem than creating global regulations or laws. And so far, we have done terrifyingly little to curb the resistance crisis at the global level, and the problem has been deemed "a classic 'tragedy of the commons'" on par with climate change.

In low- and middle-income countries, like India, the major driver of infections — and the need for antibiotics — is still poor sanitation. Many people live in areas that have been contaminated by human and animal waste, which is why ensuring clean water and sanitation for all are key to preventing the need for antibiotics. On the flip side, uncontrolled antibiotic use or the lack of access to the drugs when people need them are also drivers of the superbug problem.

In cases where poorer countries can’t address these problems themselves, global health groups and wealthier countries (like the US) will need to step in to help out. Until every country gets a grip on its superbug problem, we will keep seeing tragedies like the one in Reno turn up close to home.
http://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2017/1/13/14265620/woman-died-superbug-antibiotics

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7886
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

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