Foro Defensa México

Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo

Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Enero 4th 2015, 15:34


Greece's Political Crisis Might Force It Out Of The Euro

Mike Bird

Jan. 2, 2015, 9:42 AM
4,641
2

With Greece just three weeks away from the general election on Jan. 25, called after the country's politicians failed to elect a president at the end of December, Athens is firmly back in Europe's spotlight along with a serious discussion about whether Greece will remain in the euro.

That's because Syriza, the radical leftist coalition that wants to tear up the country's bailout rules, looks likely to win. That means a game of chicken with the EU institutions and International Monetary Fund. If either side refuses to back down, there could be market chaos, bank runs, and a forced exit from the euro.

Syriza have opened up a solid polling lead. Here's a chart from Oxford Economics:

Syriza pollsOxford Economics

It's not Syriza's official policy to leave the euro, but a solid portion of the group are happy that route, and others may join them — if pushed.

German politicians are lining up to issue stern warnings to Greece that it won't allow any further easing or assistance for struggling countries on Europe's periphery. So far Michael Fuchs, a senior parliamentarian, and Wolfgang Schaeuble, finance minister, have both cautioned against any deviation from the current austerity and reform plans.

These are the same politicians that mouthed off in 2012, and were more content with letting Greece exit then. For now, the issue hasn't spread beyond the usual suspects in German politics. There are three major reasons that could change, and Germany might become less bothered by Grexit this time round:

It might become a media and political issue. Angela Merkel's party has already lost some support to Alternative fur Deutschland, Germany's anti-euro party. Since the European Central Bank is likely to bring in quantitative easing early this year (which many Germans also see as a sort of bailout of the south), the Greek issue may get a lot of attention. That would put Chancellor Angela Merkel under more pressure to oppose more concessions.
Greece may no longer be a systemic risk for the eurozone. During the euro crisis, Greece looked like the only country which might imminently leave the eurozone, but that crisis sent the cost of borrowing for countries like Spain, Italy and Portugal soaring too. There seemed to be a risk of contagion: If Greece left, why not other countries? This time, while Greek bond yields have risen but the other countries haven't. That might be taken as a signal that it's safe to be tough with Syriza without putting other countries in danger.
They don't want to set an example. If Syriza get some of the debt reduction that they want, Morgan Stanley analysts suggest "Greece would become more like Portugal, with a similar debt stock, although better composition." That's great for Athens, but it's not clear why Lisbon would be happy. Such a move would embolden every anti-austerity party in the continent to make their own demands.

So if Syriza got elected, what might the months afterwards look like? Here's Morgan Stanley's timeline:

Screen Shot 2015 01 01 at 20.32.41Morgan Stanley

Those Eurogroup meetings in January and February, which bring together the finance ministers of the eurozone, would be crucial for testing the water. There would undoubtedly be discussions and public statements to indicate the position of different governments towards Syriza and Greece.

Greece also has big bond payments due in July and August, and Syriza have expressed no intention of sticking to the country's current austerity plan. Assuming that Syriza can form a government, the events running up to this, and hints from other European countries and institutions will be crucial.

There's a huge amount of uncertainty here, because a country has never left the euro before. It's not clear what happens when a country's government just refuses to co-operate.

Here's how Twitter's Dan Davies thinks a Grexit timeline could play out

@maxrothbarth @Frances_Coppola @Birdyword elected -> default -> bank run -> ECB puts conditionality on ELA -> Syriza refuses -> they're out
— Dan Davies (@dsquareddigest) January 1, 2015

ELA here is emergency liquidity assistance, of the sort that the ECB provided to Cyprus in 2013. Here's a great Reuters rundown of what it means. Cyprus had to agree to bailout conditions for the financial assistance to prop up its banks, something Syriza seems unlikely to sign up for.

Most analysts still think Grexit seems unlikely and have a pretty optimistic view about Syriza becoming much more moderate and co-operative if they form the government, and suggest that European institutions will offer some relief. But that depends on both sides softening their current stances, something that's not at all certain to happen.
http://www.businessinsider.com/greeces-political-crisis-euro-2015-1?nr_email_referer=1&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_content=PoliticsSelect

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Enero 4th 2015, 15:59


A German Minister Has Been In Secret Talks With Syriza For Weeks To Save The Euro

Stefano Pozzebon

Dec. 30, 2014, 12:08 PM
1,936
8

facebook
linkedin
twitter
google+

Jorg AsmussenREUTERS/Ralph OrlowskiJörg Asmussen.

German chancellor Angela Merkel has been preparing for weeks for a new, centre-left government in Athens, according to the Italian newspaper La Stampa.

The paper wrote that Jörg Asmussen, a minister in the German cabinet, has been for some time in secret talks with senior members of Syriza, the anti-austerity Greek party currently on the opposition but expected to take power in the next general election in Athens.

Asmussen, who previously sat on the European Central Bank Executive Board, is described as a favourite of both ECB's president Mario Draghi and Germany's economic minister Wolfgang Schäuble. He is the man chosen by Frankfurt and Berlin to deal with Alexis Tsipras, the leader of Syriza who is advocating for a total wipe out of the Greek foreign debt.

At the same time, Niko Pappas, a spokesman from Syriza, said that the party will not pull Greece out of the eurozone and "will not take unilateral decisions" if it takes power in the elections, scheduled for Jan. 25.

Earlier this month, Schäuble said that "any new government must compel with the duties taken by its predecessor," meaning that even if Syriza wins the elections, Greece will still have to act according the bailout agreement with the ECB and IMF.

Schäuble is firmly against any form of quantitative easing in the early months of 2015, a move that would boost the support of other anti-austerity parties across the continent, from Spain's Podemos to Italy's Five Star Movement.

The mediation between Asmussen and the new leaders of the Greek parliament is therefore more important than ever.
http://www.businessinsider.com/jorg-asmussen-is-in-talks-with-syriza-2014-12?nr_email_referer=1&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_content=PoliticsSelect

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Enero 27th 2015, 04:45


Coalición izquierdista gana elecciones en Grecia, según sondeos





El partido de oposición liderado por Alex Tsipras ganó la elecciones al obtener, entre un 35,5% y un 39, 5%.
Comparta la noticia en:

El partido de oposición griega liderado por Alex Tsipras, ganó la elecciones en Grecia al obtener, entre un 35,5% y un 39, 5% de los votos, según los últimos reportes de sondeos a pie de urna en el país Helénico.

Tspiras aspira a que Grecia vincule su futuro con Europa y que la Unión europea modifique sus políticas de austeridad con dicho país. Para muchos expertos, era necesario que Syriza llegará al poder en Grecia para darle al país un nuevo impulso político y económico, según reseñó una reconocida agencia internacional.

Así mismo, se reportó que los conservadores de Nueva Democracia, inmediatos seguidores de Syriza y liderados por el primer Ministro Adonis Samarás, obtuvieron según los sondeos entre un 23% y un 27% de la votación total.
http://www.hsbnoticias.com/vernoticia.asp?ac=Coalicion-izquierdista-gana-elecciones-en-Grecia--segun-sondeos&WPLACA=128584

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Enero 27th 2015, 04:47


The New Drivers of Europe's Geopolitics
Geopolitical Weekly
January 27, 2015 | 02:00 GMT Print Text Size
Stratfor

By George Friedman

For the past two weeks, I have focused on the growing fragmentation of Europe. Two weeks ago, the murders in Paris prompted me to write about the fault line between Europe and the Islamic world. Last week, I wrote about the nationalism that is rising in individual European countries after the European Central Bank was forced to allow national banks to participate in quantitative easing so European nations wouldn't be forced to bear the debt of other nations. I am focusing on fragmentation partly because it is happening before our eyes, partly because Stratfor has been forecasting this for a long time and partly because my new book on the fragmentation of Europe — Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis in Europe — is being released today.

This is the week to speak of the political and social fragmentation within European nations and its impact on Europe as a whole. The coalition of the Radical Left party, known as Syriza, has scored a major victory in Greece. Now the party is forming a ruling coalition and overwhelming the traditional mainstream parties. It is drawing along other left-wing and right-wing parties that are united only in their resistance to the EU's insistence that austerity is the solution to the ongoing economic crisis that began in 2008.
Two Versions of the Same Tale

The story is well known. The financial crisis of 2008, which began as a mortgage default issue in the United States, created a sovereign debt crisis in Europe. Some European countries were unable to make payment on bonds, and this threatened the European banking system. There had to be some sort of state intervention, but there was a fundamental disagreement about what problem had to be solved. Broadly speaking, there were two narratives.

The German version, and the one that became the conventional view in Europe, is that the sovereign debt crisis is the result of irresponsible social policies in Greece, the country with the greatest debt problem. These troublesome policies included early retirement for government workers, excessive unemployment benefits and so on. Politicians had bought votes by squandering resources on social programs the country couldn't afford, did not rigorously collect taxes and failed to promote hard work and industriousness. Therefore, the crisis that was threatening the banking system was rooted in the irresponsibility of the debtors.

Another version, hardly heard in the early days but far more credible today, is that the crisis is the result of Germany's irresponsibility. Germany, the fourth-largest economy in the world, exports the equivalent of about 50 percent of its gross domestic product because German consumers cannot support its oversized industrial output. The result is that Germany survives on an export surge. For Germany, the European Union — with its free-trade zone, the euro and regulations in Brussels — is a means for maintaining exports. The loans German banks made to countries such as Greece after 2009 were designed to maintain demand for its exports. The Germans knew the debts could not be repaid, but they wanted to kick the can down the road and avoid dealing with the fact that their export addiction could not be maintained.

If you accept the German narrative, then the policies that must be followed are the ones that would force Greece to clean up its act. That means continuing to impose austerity on the Greeks. If the Greek narrative is correct, than the problem is with Germany. To end the crisis, Germany would have to curb its appetite for exports and shift Europe's rules on trade, the valuation of the euro and regulation from Brussels while living within its means. This would mean reducing its exports to the free-trade zone that has an industry incapable of competing with Germany's.

The German narrative has been overwhelmingly accepted, and the Greek version has hardly been heard. I describe what happened when austerity was imposed in Flashpoints:

But the impact on Greece of government cuts was far greater than expected. Like many European countries, the Greeks ran many economic activities, including medicine and other essential services, through the state, making physicians and other health care professionals government employees. When cuts were made in public sector pay and employment, it deeply affected the professional and middle classes.

Over the course of several years, unemployment in Greece rose to over 25 percent. This was higher than unemployment in the United States during the Depression. Some said that Greece's black economy was making up the difference and things weren't that bad. That was true to some extent but not nearly as much as people thought, since the black economy was simply an extension of the rest of the economy, and business was bad everywhere. In fact the situation was worse than it appeared to be, since there were many government workers who were still employed but had had their wages cut drastically, many by as much as two-thirds.

The Greek story was repeated in Spain and, to a somewhat lesser extent, in Portugal, southern France and southern Italy. Mediterranean Europe had entered the European Union with the expectation that membership would raise its living standards to the level of northern Europe. The sovereign debt crisis hit them particularly hard because in the free trade zone, this region had found it difficult to develop its economies, as it would have normally. Therefore the first economic crisis devastated them.

Regardless of which version you believe to be true, there is one thing that is certain: Greece was put in an impossible position when it agreed to a debt repayment plan that its economy could not support. These plans plunged it into a depression it still has not recovered from — and the problems have spread to other parts of Europe.
Seeds of Discontent

There was a deep belief in the European Union and beyond that the nations adhering to Europe's rules would, in due course, recover. Europe's mainstream political parties supported the European Union and its policies, and they were elected and re-elected. There was a general feeling that economic dysfunction would pass. But it is 2015 now, the situation has not gotten better and there are growing movements in many countries that are opposed to continuing with austerity. The sense that Europe is shifting was visible in the European Central Bank's decision last week to ease austerity by increasing liquidity in the system. In my view, this is too little too late; although quantitative easing might work for a recession, Southern Europe is in a depression. This is not merely a word. It means that the infrastructure of businesses that are able to utilize the money has been smashed, and therefore, quantitative easing's impact on unemployment will be limited. It takes a generation to recover from a depression. Interestingly, the European Central Bank excluded Greece from the quantitative easing program, saying the country is far too exposed to debt to allow the risk of its central bank lending.

Virtually every European country has developed growing movements that oppose the European Union and its policies. Most of these are on the right of the political spectrum. This means that in addition to their economic grievances, they want to regain control of their borders to limit immigration. Opposition movements have also emerged from the left — Podemos in Spain, for instance, and of course, Syriza in Greece. The left has the same grievances as the right, save for the racial overtones. But what is important is this: Greece has been seen as the outlier, but it is in fact the leading edge of the European crisis. It was the first to face default, the first to impose austerity, the first to experience the brutal weight that resulted and now it is the first to elect a government that pledges to end austerity. Left or right, these parties are threatening Europe's traditional parties, which the middle and lower class see as being complicit with Germany in creating the austerity regime.

Syriza has moderated its position on the European Union, as parties are wont to moderate during an election. But its position is that it will negotiate a new program of Greek debt repayments to its European lenders, one that will relieve the burden on the Greeks. There is reason to believe that it might succeed. The Germans don't care if Greece pulls out of the euro. Germany is, however, terrified that the political movements that are afoot will end or inhibit Europe's free-trade zone. Right-wing parties' goal of limiting the cross-border movement of workers already represents an open demand for an end to the free-trade zone for labor. But Germany, the export addict, needs the free-trade zone badly.

This is one of the points that people miss. They are concerned that countries will withdraw from the euro. As Hungary showed when the forint's decline put its citizens in danger of defaulting on mortgages, a nation-state has the power to protect its citizens from debt if it wishes to do so. The Greeks, inside or outside the eurozone, can also exercise this power. In addition to being unable to repay their debt structurally, they cannot afford to repay it politically. The parties that supported austerity in Greece were crushed. The mainstream parties in other European countries saw what happened in Greece and are aware of the rising force of Euroskepticism in their own countries. The ability of these parties to comply with these burdens is dependent on the voters, and their political base is dissolving. Rational politicians are not dismissing Syriza as an outrider.

The issue then is not the euro. Instead, the first real issue is the effect of structured or unstructured defaults on the European banking system and how the European Central Bank, committed to not making Germany liable for the debts of other countries, will handle that. The second, and more important, issue is now the future of the free-trade zone. Having open borders seemed like a good idea during prosperous times, but the fear of Islamist terrorism and the fear of Italians competing with Bulgarians for scarce jobs make those open borders less and less likely to endure. And if nations can erect walls for people, then why not erect walls for goods to protect their own industries and jobs? In the long run, protectionism hurts the economy, but Europe is dealing with many people who don't have a long run, have fallen from the professional classes and now worry about how they will feed their families.

For Germany, which depends on free access to Europe's markets to help prop up its export-dependent economy, the loss of the euro would be the loss of a tool for managing trade within and outside the eurozone. But the rise of protectionism in Europe would be a calamity. The German economy would stagger without those exports.

From my point of view, the argument about austerity is over. The European Central Bank ended the austerity regime half-heartedly last week, and the Syriza victory sent an earthquake through Europe's political system, although the Eurocratic elite will dismiss it as an outlier. If Europe's defaults — structured or unstructured — surge as a result, the question of the euro becomes an interesting but non-critical issue. What will become the issue, and what is already becoming the issue, is free trade. That is the core of the European concept, and that is the next issue on the agenda as the German narrative loses credibility and the Greek narrative replaces it as the conventional wisdom.

It is not hard to imagine the disaster that would ensue if the United States were to export 50 percent of its GDP, and half of it went to Canada and Mexico. A free-trade zone in which the giant pivot is not a net importer can't work. And that is exactly the situation in Europe. Its pivot is Germany, but rather than serving as the engine of growth by being an importer, it became the world's fourth-largest national economy by exporting half its GDP. That can't possibly be sustainable.
Possible Seismic Changes Ahead

There are then three drivers in Europe now. One is the desire to control borders — nominally to control Islamist terrorists but truthfully to limit the movement of all labor, Muslims included. Second, there is the empowerment of the nation-states in Europe by the European Central Bank, which is making its quantitative easing program run through national banks, which may only buy their own nation's debt. Third, there is the political base, which is dissolving under Europe's feet.

The question about Europe now is not whether it can retain its current form, but how radically that form will change. And the most daunting question is whether Europe, unable to maintain its union, will see a return of nationalism and its possible consequences. As I put it in Flashpoints:

The most important question in the world is whether conflict and war have actually been banished or whether this is merely an interlude, a seductive illusion. Europe is the single most prosperous region in the world. Its collective GDP is greater than that of the United States. It touches Asia, the Middle East and Africa. Another series of wars would change not only Europe, but the entire world.

To even speak of war in Europe would have been preposterous a few years ago, and to many, it is preposterous today. But Ukraine is very much a part of Europe, as was Yugoslavia. Europeans' confidence that all this is behind them, the sense of European exceptionalism, may well be correct. But as Europe's institutions disintegrate, it is not too early to ask what comes next. History rarely provides the answer you expect — and certainly not the answer you hope for.

Editor's Note: The newest book by Stratfor chairman and founder George Friedman, Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis in Europe, is being released today. It is now available.
http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/new-drivers-europes-geopolitics#axzz3PxWiORCF

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Enero 27th 2015, 04:53


The European Union, Nationalism and the Crisis of Europe
Geopolitical Weekly
January 20, 2015 | 09:00 GMT Print Text Size
Stratfor

By George Friedman

Last week, I wrote about the crisis of Islamic radicalism and the problem of European nationalism. This week's events give me the opportunity to address the question of European nationalism again, this time from the standpoint of the European Union and the European Central Bank, using a term that only an economist could invent: "quantitative easing."

European media has been flooded for the past week with leaks about the European Central Bank's forthcoming plan to stimulate the faltering European economy by implementing quantitative easing. First carried by Der Spiegel and then picked up by other media, the story has not been denied by anyone at the bank nor any senior European official. We can therefore call this an official leak, because it lets everyone know what is coming before an official announcement is made later in the week.

The plan is an attempt to spur economic activity in Europe by increasing the amount of money available. It calls for governments to increase their borrowing for various projects designed to increase growth and decrease unemployment. Rather than selling the bonds on the open market, a move that would trigger a rise in interest rates, the bonds are sold to the central banks of eurozone member states, which have the ability to print new money. The money is then sent to the treasury. With more money flowing through the system, recessions driven by a lack of capital are relieved. This is why the measure is called quantitative easing.

The United States did this in 2008. In addition to government debt, the Federal Reserve also bought corporate debt. The hyperinflation that some had feared would result from the move never materialized, and the U.S. economy hit a 5 percent growth rate in the third quarter of last year. The Europeans chose not to pursue this route, and as a result, the European economy is, at best, languishing. Now the Europeans will begin such a program — several years after the Americans did — in the hopes of moving things forward again.

The European strategy is vitally different, however. The Federal Reserve printed the money and bought the cash. The European Central Bank will also print the money, but each eurozone country's individual national bank will do the purchasing, and each will be allowed only to buy the debt of its own government. The reason for this decision reveals much about Europe's real crisis, which is not so much economic (although it is certainly economic) as it is political and social — and ultimately cultural and moral.

The recent leaks have made it clear the European Central Bank is implementing quantitative easing in this way because many eurozone governments are unable to pay their sovereign debt. European countries do not want to cover each other's shortfalls, either directly or by exposing the central bank to losses, a move that would make all members liable. In particular, Berlin does not want to be in a position where a series of defaults could cripple Europe as a whole and therefore cripple Germany. This is why the country has resisted quantitative easing, even in the face of depressions in Southern Europe, recessions elsewhere and contractions in demand for German products that have driven German economic growth downward. Berlin preferred those outcomes to the risk of becoming liable for the defaults of other countries.

The major negotiation over this shift took place between European Central Bank head Mario Draghi and German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Draghi realized that if quantitative easing was not done, Europe's economy could crumble. While Merkel is responsible for the fate of Germany, not Europe, she also needs a viable free trade zone in Europe because Germany exports more than 50 percent of its gross domestic product. The country cannot stand to lose free access to Europe's markets because of plunging demand, but it will not underwrite Europe's debt. The two leaders compromised by agreeing to have the central bank print the money and give it to the national banks on a formula that has yet to be determined — and then it is every man for himself.

The European Central Bank is providing the mechanism for stimulating Europe's economy, while the eurozone member states will assume the responsibility for stimulating it — and living with the consequences of failure. It is as if the Federal Reserve were to print money and give some to each state so that New York could buy its own debt and not become exposed to California's casual ways. The strangeness of the plan rests in the strangeness of the European experiment. California and New York share a common fate as part of the United States. While Germany and Greece are both part of the European Union, they do not and will not share a common fate. If they do not share a common fate, then what exactly is the purpose of the European Union? It was never supposed to be about "the pursuit of happiness," but instead about "peace and prosperity." The promise is the not right to pursue, but the right to have. That is a huge difference.

The anthem of the European Union is from Beethoven's 9th Symphony, which contains these lines from the German poet Friedrich Schiller:

Joy, beautiful sparkle of the gods,

Daughter of Elysium,

We enter, fire-drunk,

Heavenly one, your shrine.

Your magic binds again

What custom has strictly parted.

All men become brothers

Where your tender wing lingers.

I wrote in my new book, Flashpoint: The Coming Crisis in Europe, that Europe is about:

"…the joy of joining men into a single brotherhood, overcoming the divisions of mere custom. Then there would be joy. Brotherhood means shared fate. If all that binds you is peace and prosperity, then that must never depart. If some become poor and others rich, if some go to war and others don't, then where is the shared fate?"

A Crisis of Brotherhood

Europe's crisis is not ultimately an economic one. Everyone — families and nations — has economic problems. The crisis is not war, which tragically is as common as poverty. Europe's problem is that it promised a joy beyond custom, a joy yielding brotherhood and abolishing war, and a promise based on prosperity, which is a promise so vast it is beyond anyone's hope to make perpetual. Neither perpetual peace nor perpetual prosperity can be guaranteed, therefore the joy that would overcome custom and bind men in brotherhood is a base of sand.

In the European Central Bank's compromise with Germany, we can see not only the base of sand dissolving but also the brotherhood of Europe falling apart. At the heart of this promise is the idea that Germany will not share the fate of Greece, nor France the fate of Italy. In the end, these are different nations. Their customs can be overcome by the joy uniting them in brotherhood, but absent that joy, absent peace and prosperity, there is nothing binding them together.

The test of the American Republic came when the idea that all men are created equal and endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights was juxtaposed with the brutishness of slavery. Prior to the revolution, these United States were divided into sovereignties so profound that many states saw themselves as individual nations not bound by the promises of the Declaration of Independence. They believed themselves free to withdraw from the federation if displeased by others' moral interpretations of the Declaration. What ensued was the Civil War, which was fought, as Abraham Lincoln put it, to test whether a nation so constituted could long endure.

That is precisely the question of the European Union. Can an entity, founded on nations of wildly different customs, expectations and economies long endure and share a common fate? In the dry technicalities of quantitative easing, Europe has defined its limits of brotherhood. One of those limits is prosperity. Each nation determines how it will plot its own course, its money distributed by the European Central Bank, but under the rules of the individual states and without any nation being compelled to share the fate of another. The euro is a common currency that has no one's picture on the front because the histories of eurozone countries are so divided that there are no common heroes. The United States knows that Washington, Lincoln, Hamilton, Jackson, Grant and Franklin are our common heritage. There is no such commonality in Europe, and, therefore, no transcendence of the customs of nations.

The strategy proposed for quantitative easing is a great compromise, and it may solve the economic problem. But at its first test, hardly on the order of slavery and the American Civil War, Europe has failed a more profound test: brotherhood, which is men bound together by a joy-transcending culture.

Some will say that I am making too much over a useful political compromise — that the basic institutions of Europe remain, and we therefore have a useful solution to the problem. I think this argument misses the deeper point. Europe never expected to face this crisis because it thought peace and prosperity would endure. It has not because it could not. Quantitative easing is not merely the desire to avoid responsibility for prosperity. There is no unity in Europe over the fears of Romania or Russia about Ukraine. There is no real unity over how to face terrorism in the name of Islam. There is simply no unity.

If Europe can parse the common search for prosperity in this way and calmly consider the secession of one of the brotherhood, Greece, over malfeasance far from terrible on the order of human things, then what is to keep any of the Europe's institutions intact? If you can secede or be expelled from the eurozone, and if you might choose to close your border to Slovaks seeking jobs in Denmark, then perhaps you can choose to close your borders to German products. And if that is possible, then what is the fate of Germany, which relies on its ability to sell its goods anywhere in Europe? After all, it is not only the poor and weak in Europe whose fates are at risk.

In the end, Europe becomes not so much a moral project as it does a convenience, a treaty, which is something a country can leave at will if it is in its interest to do so. When the South seceded from the United States, Northern men were prepared to die to preserve the Union. Is there anyone who would give his life to preserve the European Union, block secession and demand a permanent, shared fate?

I predicted that a decisive moment would arrive in Europe, but the speed at which it did surprised me. I expect that its institutions will survive a while, and I expect that most people will think I am overreacting. That's possible, but I don't think so. Regardless of the technical and political purpose behind the decision to implement quantitative easing, and however defensible it is on its own grounds, the moral lesson is that Europe ultimately is a continent, not an idea.

Last week, the question was why Europe found it so difficult to assimilate immigrants and why it resorted to multiculturalism. The answer was that the customs of the nation-state made it impossible to imagine someone born outside the customs of the nation-state to truly become part of its brotherhood. This week, the question is why the European Central Bank cannot distribute the money it prints but will give it to national banks to manage. The answer is that no country wants to be responsible for the debts of anyone else in Europe. That is not a foolish position, but it makes a union impossible, certainly not one that can overcome custom.

In Flashpoints, I wrote the following:

"We are now living through Europe's test. As all human institutions do, the European Union is going through a time of intense problems, mostly economic for the moment. The European Union was founded for "peace and prosperity." If prosperity disappears, or disappears in some nations, what happens to peace?...That is what this book is about. It is partly about the sense of European exceptionalism, the idea that they have solved the problems of peace and prosperity that the rest of the world has not."

But if Europe is not exceptional and is in trouble, what comes next? The history of Europe should give us no comfort.

Editor's Note: The newest book by Stratfor chairman and founder George Friedman, Flashpoints: The Emerging Crisis in Europe, will be released Jan. 27. It is now available for pre-order.
http://www.stratfor.com/weekly/european-union-nationalism-and-crisis-europe#axzz3PMtY6OsF

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Enero 27th 2015, 05:03


España ha dado a Grecia... ¡lo que se gasta en un año en prestaciones de desempleo!

lainformacion.com

lunes, 26/01/15 - 15:20
[ ]

Luis de Guindos cifró en unos 26.000 millones de euros la aportación de Madrid a Atenas, "lo que nos gastamos en prestaciones de desempleo en un año en un país que tiene un paro del 23,7%".
Recordó al nuevo gobierno heleno que necesitará unos 10.000 millones de euros adicionales hasta agosto que no encontrará en los mercados.

De Guindos no cree que la victoria de Syriza vaya a impulsar a Podemos

El ministro español de Economía y Competitividad, Luis de Guindos, recordó este lunes al nuevo Gobierno griego que necesitará unos 10.000 millones de euros adicionales hasta agosto que no encontrará en los mercados y que ahora mismo no está sobre la mesa la discusión sobre una eventual quita.

De Guindos felicitó al nuevo Gobierno griego liderado por Alexis Tsipras, quien juró este lunes su cargo en Atenas, y le transmitió que el Eurogrupo están abiertos a "continuar la negociación con ellos".

"En estos momentos Grecia no tiene acceso a los mercados, tiene que continuar financiándose y hay unas necesidades de financiación importantes en los próximos meses", dijo De Guindos a su llegada a la reunión de los ministros de Economía y Finanzas de la eurozona, donde cifró esas necesidades en unos "10.000 millones de euros adicionales hasta finales de agosto".

Para el ministro español no se trata solo de la reestructuración de la deuda antigua, pese a que "en este momento eso no está encima de la mesa", en referencia a una conferencia internacional de deuda.

"Al igual que ocurría con los gobiernos (griegos) anteriores, en el Eurogrupo vamos a ver las necesidades de financiación" de Atenas y al igual que en el pasado, los socios de la eurozona "están dispuesto a hablar con ellos", agregó.

Recordó que desde que es ministro de Economía de España ha participado en cuatro modificaciones de las condiciones de la financiación otorgada a Grecia en el Eurogrupo, a través de préstamos bilaterales y el fondo temporal de rescate.

"Hemos alargado hasta 30 años el plazo de devolución, reducimos los tipos de interés y concedimos una moratoria de 10 años" en el pago de intereses al fondo de rescate, por lo que el peso de los intereses de la deuda en el caso de Grecia "no es especialmente elevado", sino el ratio de la deuda relativa al PIB.

"Lo más importante ahora y que a veces se olvida, es que Grecia va a necesitar mucha financiación y no la va a obtener en los mercados", subrayó De Guindos.

"La va a obtener fundamentalmente a través de la financiación que ya está proporcionando el Eurogrupo y la solidaridad europea", agregó el ministro español.-

Agregó que España ha dado unos 26.000 millones de euros directa e indirectamente a Grecia, "lo que nos gastamos en prestaciones de desempleo en un año en un país que tiene un paro del 23,7%".

"Eso es lo que demuestra la solidaridad de España con Grecia", sostuvo De Guindos, quien reiteró que "estamos abiertos a negociar con el nuevo Gobierno griego".

Subrayó que "los compromisos son muy importantes a efectos de conseguir esa financiación que Grecia necesita para pagar sus pensiones, a sus funcionarios, a su Sanidad pública, entre otros gastos.

"Lógicamente también Grecia tiene que hacer sus reformas, porque está en una situación en la cual ha perdido un 25% del PIB", añadió De Guindos, quien se mostró seguro de que el nuevo Gobierno de Tsipras "va a estar preocupado por este tipo de cuestiones, por que haya crecimiento económico y creación de empleo".

De Guindos admitió que "siempre las cosas se pueden hacer mejor", al tiempo que apuntó a que la zona del euro ha concedido a Grecia 210.000 millones de euros sin los cuales "no hubiera podido financiar sus servicios públicos fundamentales".

Además, subrayó, los más interesados en que haya crecimiento y se genere empleo y se continúe dentro del euro "es la propia sociedad griega".
http://noticias.lainformacion.com/economia-negocios-y-finanzas/espana-ha-dado-a-grecia-lo-que-se-gasta-en-un-ano-en-prestaciones-de-desempleo_RLMAVixr0ljJ1ZlWayyHh5/?utm_source=LAINFO+-+Kit+buenos+d%C3%ADas&utm_campaign=3ad2710664-inf27012015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_378063843d-3ad2710664-181494177

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Enero 31st 2015, 12:35


De bloguero peleón a ministro de Finanzas de Grecia: así es Yanis Varoufakis

28 enero 2015 - 9:13 - Autor: zoomboomcrash
Tweet

Con su aspecto de boxeador callejero que hacer huir a los malos, Varoufakis se está convirtiendo en el centro de atención. Primero porque es el nuevo ministro de Finanzas, es decir, la persona que va a desafiar en status quo del FMI, el Banco Central Europeo y el Eurogrupo. ¿Pagará o no pagará?

Segundo, porque su aspecto va a atraer la atención de los periodistas que buscamos novedades en la política, alguien que no se parezca a lo conocido. Y Varoufakis puede ser ese personaje.

Nacido en Atenas en 1961 (53 años), pero de nacionalidad griega y australiana, consiguió su doctorado en Economía por la universidad de Essex, y le gusta la matemática. Es profesor de Teoría Económica en la Universidad de Atenas , autor de un libro llamado “El minotauro global”, escritor de ‘textos oscuros de economía’ como se presenta él mismo, especialista en la teoría de juegos, y autor de numerosos artículos sobre Grecia, la deuda y los banqueros que quieren hundir a los países del sur de Europa.

Con esa sólida formación económica, la troika va a tener que armarse de argumentos para discutir cada euro de deuda griega. Pues la tesis de Varoufakis es que “la inevitable crisis de la zona euro se abordó mediante una transferencia cínica de las pérdidas bancarias sobre los hombros de los contribuyentes más débiles”.

¿Por qué se lanzó a la política?

“Nunca fue mi intención entrar en el juego electoral. Desde que comenzó la crisis, me mantuve con la esperanza de mantener un diálogo abierto con los políticos razonables de diferentes partidos políticos. Por desgracia, los “rescates” hicieron imposible ese diálogo abierto”, dice en un post.

Su blog -yanisvaroufakis.eu- está escrito en inglés con el subtítulo de ‘pensamientos para después de 2008′ (el año de la crisis). Pero no es cualquier blog: está muy bien diseñado, lleno de vídeos, podcast, memes y que sabe usar todos los recursos de un bloguero avanzado. Y escrito con un estilo peleón y reivindicativo de profesor que entusiasma a sus alumnos.

Usa metáforas y prosa ardiente para atacar a los banqueros y a los capitalistas, pero aclara que él no es ningún loco radical. Para demostrarlo, luce en su blog una entrevista que le realizó el diario británico The Telegraph donde se dice que no es un extremista que ‘va a incendiar Grecia’.

Sus tesis económicas esenciales se resumen en un documento titulado ‘A modest proposal‘ (Una propuesta modesta), realizada en 2010 con otros economistas. Allí expone la necesidad de modificar las condiciones de la deuda griega, y cómo relanzar la economía europea con un nuevo Plan Marshall consistente en que el BCE compre bonos de los estados para financiar la recuperación (por cierto, algo que está haciendo desde hace una semana).

Sabe manejar las redes sociales (él solito, no con ayuda de comunity managers), y en Twitter ya tiene más de 130.000 seguidores. En pocos días se disparará ese número. Ya ha avisado que no podrá ser tan activo tanto en redes como en su blog, pues otros menesteres le llaman.

Tiene que salvar la economía de Grecia. Y debe hacerlo ya.
http://blogs.lainformacion.com/zoomboomcrash/2015/01/28/de-bloguero-peleon-a-ministro-de-finanzas-de-grecia-asi-es-yanis-varoufakis/

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Enero 31st 2015, 12:36


S&P amenaza con rebajar la nota de Grecia por las propuestas de Tsipras

lainformacion.com

miércoles, 28/01/15 - 20:13
[ ]

La agencia de calificación crediticia considera que algunas de las políticas presupuestarias y económicas que defiende el nuevo Gobierno griego son "incompatibles" con el marco político acordado por el anterior Ejecutivo con sus acreedores.
Advierte de que si el nuevo Gobierno de Alexis Tsipras no logra alcanzar un acuerdo con sus acreedores sobre un nuevo apoyo financiero, se debilitará su posición financiera y su solvencia.

El IBEX 35 pierde los 10.500 puntos, al bajar el 1,34 %, afectado por Grecia

La agencia de calificación crediticia Standard & Poor's (S&P) ha situado en revisión para una posible rebaja el rating 'B' de Grecia, ya que considera que algunas de las políticas presupuestarias y económicas que defiende el nuevo Gobierno griego son "incompatibles" con el marco político acordado por el anterior Ejecutivo con sus acreedores.

La agencia, que prevé tomar una decisión cuando actualice su rating de Grecia el próximo 13 de marzo, advierte de que si el nuevo Gobierno de Alexis Tsipras no logra alcanzar un acuerdo con sus acreedores sobre un nuevo apoyo financiero, se debilitará su posición financiera y su solvencia.

"Podríamos rebajar el rating si las negociaciones con la Unión Europea (UE), el Banco Central Europeo (BCE) y el Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI) entran en un callejón sin salida, limitando la capacidad de Grecia de hacer frente a su servicio de deuda", remarca S&P.

La agencia subraya que, dado su limitado acceso a los mercados de deuda, el país depende de la ayuda financiera de sus socios para hacer frente a los vencimientos de 17.000 millones de euros previstos para 2015. Así, espera que, aunque la ampliación del programa de ayuda acaba el 28 de febrero, éste se prorrogue para dar tiempo al nuevo Gobierno a negociar posibles cambios.

Asimismo, recalca que algunas de las propuestas recogidas en el programa electoral de Syriza, como el incremento del salario mínimo o la eliminación del impuesto a la propiedad, no están en línea con lo recogido en el Memorándum de Entendimiento (MoU) del rescate.

Por ello, espera que tras la formación del nuevo Gobierno comiencen las negociaciones sobre los términos y las condiciones de un nuevo apoyo financiero. En su escenario central, la agencia prevé que ambas partes alcancen un acuerdo, dados los esfuerzos realizados por evitar la quiebra del país.

Así, considera que si las negociaciones tienen éxito la economía helena seguirá recuperándose de forma gradual a pesar de la actual incertidumbre política, pero si no hay acuerdo podría verse dañada su recuperación y el desempeño de su presupuesto, aumentando los riesgos para la estabilidad de sus sistema bancario.
http://noticias.lainformacion.com/economia-negocios-y-finanzas/construccion-e-inmobiliaria/s-p-amenaza-con-rebajar-la-nota-de-grecia-por-las-propuestas-de-tsipras_oXAmtIHgIYDotVWpEKJqC/?utm_source=LAINFO+-+Kit+buenos+d%C3%ADas&utm_campaign=10dc205616-inf29012015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_378063843d-10dc205616-181494177

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Enero 31st 2015, 12:37


Tsipras paraliza la privatización de entes públicos y la bolsa se desploma un 9,24%

lainformacion.com

miércoles, 28/01/15 - 11:55
[ ]

Entre las mayores caídas de la jornada, los bancos se han vuelto a llevar la peor parte.
La prima de riesgo se ha disparado casi 100 puntos y ha superado los 1.000, al pasar desde los 948 enteros de la apertura hasta un máximo de 1.040,4.


La Bolsa de Atenas se desploma un 9,24 % tras la toma de posesión del Gobierno

La Bolsa de Atenas se ha desplomado un 9,24% y la prima de riesgo del bono a diez años se ha disparado por encima de los 1.000 puntos básicos, tras el anuncio de las primeras medidas previstas por el nuevo Gobierno griego.

En concreto, el índice de referencia de la Bolsa griega ha cerrado en los 711,13 puntos, lo que supone un 9,24% menos que los 783,53 enteros en los que cerró el martes, con lo que acumula tres jornadas consecutivas en negativo, ya que el lunes cerró con una caída del 3,2% y el martes con un descenso del 3,64%.

Entre las mayores caídas de la jornada, los bancos se han vuelto a llevar la peor parte, ya que las acciones de Piraeus Bank se han desplomado un 29,26%, las de Alpha Bank un 26,76%, las de Eurobank Ergas un 25,93% y las National Bank of Greece un 25,45%.

Una de las medidas adoptadas en el primer consejo de ministros del Gobierno de Alexis Tsipras ha sido paralizar la venta del 30% de la Corporación Pública de Energía de Grecia (PPC), la mayor del país, cuyo valor se ha hundido en bolsa un 13,93%.

En el mercado secundario, la prima de riesgo de Grecia se ha disparado casi 100 puntos básicos y ha superado los 1.000 puntos básicas, al pasar desde los 948 enteros de la apertura hasta un máximo intradiario de 1.040,4 puntos básicos.

Esta aumento de la prima de riesgo es consecuencia del fuerte repunte de la rentabilidad de los bonos griegos a diez años, que alcanzaba el 10,754%, en comparación con el 9,595% en los que ha abierto la sesión.

En esta línea, el interés del bono heleno a cinco años en los mercados secundarios ha pasado desde el 11,826% de la apertura hasta el 13,621%, mientras que el del bono a tres años ha subido desde el 13,754% hasta el 16,948%.

Además de la paralización de la privatización de empresas públicas, el Gobierno ha prometido subir las pensiones a las personas con bajos ingresos y devolver sus puestos a algunos de los funcionarios que fueron despedidos, así como renegociar el rescate acordado con sus socios europeos.
http://noticias.lainformacion.com/economia-negocios-y-finanzas/tsipras-paraliza-la-privatizacion-de-entes-publicos-y-la-bolsa-se-desploma-un-9-24_eKtX3tfSx8fukxIlnkit61/?utm_source=LAINFO+-+Kit+buenos+d%C3%ADas&utm_campaign=10dc205616-inf29012015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_378063843d-10dc205616-181494177

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Enero 31st 2015, 12:37


Tsipras presenta su gobierno de "salvación social" entre dudas de cómo se financiará

David Iglesias

miércoles, 28/01/15 - 12:31
[ ]

El nuevo gobierno griego de la izquierdista Syriza paralizará "inmediatamente" las privatizaciones de las eléctricas y dará luz gratis a 300.000 hogares.
Se incrementa el salario mínimo en 125 euros, pasando de 586 a 751; los griegos dejarán de pagar cinco euros por ir al hospital. Tsipras aún tiene que explicar cómo pagará todo.

El Gobierno griego anuncia que mantendrá una reunión informativa diaria con la prensa

Alexis Tsipras ha empezado su gobierno de forma frenética. No han pasado ni 72 horas desde unas elecciones en las que los griegos provocaron un terremoto político y ya hay nuevo gobierno, unos ministros manos a la obra y una batería de medidas concretas sobre la mesa.

Algo inédito en una Grecia en la que durante muchos años se han hecho las cosas a "ritmo mediterráneo"; y quizá por eso un partido como Syriza haya llegado al poder, capitalizando el hartazgo de una Grecia cansada de la corrupción y del desgobierno de su país.

También te puede interesar: La paralización de la privatización de empresas públicas desploma la bolsa griega un 9,24%

Esta mañana el nuevo Ejecutivo de Tsipras ha reunido por primera vez a sus ministros, después de un día de cruce de declaraciones -respetuosas pero claras- entre Grecia y la Unión Europea.

En Atenas impera la tesis de que Grecia no puede pagar, y quiere que en Bruselas se hagan a la idea. Respeto por los tratados sí, pero no a los acuerdos alcanzados por el anterior gobierno, dice un Tsipras que con sus decisiones podría abrir la caja de los truenos comunitaria.

Mientras, desde Bruselas y Frankfurt muestran respeto por el nuevo gobierno de Tsipras pero le recuerdan sin ambages que Grecia seguirá necesitando financiación, y que la única forma de lograrlo es garantizando lo pactado hasta la fecha. Si no, ni un sólo euro más. Y va en serio; después de todo, países como España ya se han gastado con el país heleno cifras astronómicas que igualan a las prestaciones por desempleo... durante un año entero.

El primero en hacer declaraciones de alto voltaje fue el ministro de Reconstrucción Productiva, Medio Ambiente y Energía, Panayiotis Lafazanis, que este miércoles anunció que su gobierno paralizará "inmediatamente" todo proceso de privatización de las eléctricas. Este era un punto clave, en sintonía con la promesa electoral de ofrecer electricidad gratuita a los más pobres. Según anunció, 300.000 hogares se beneficiarán de la nueva medida.

También te puede interesar: Tsipras forma un equipo de Gobierno con diez ministros, ocho menos que Samarás

La ola privatizadora no sólo alcanzará a este sector. También a otros donde se estén planificando o ejecutando privatizaciones que vayan en contra de objetivos sociales, en clara alusión a puertos y aeropuertos. Pero sin concretar más, abriendo un cajón de sastre donde entran muchas cosas.

Fue el propio Tsipras quien, poco después, ahondó en este espíritu del que quiere revestir a su ejecutivo, en el que 'social' se apunta como el concepto clave y el tamiz por el cual pasarán todas las decisiones del nuevo gobierno. Así, el salario mínimo se incrementará en 125 euros, pasando de 586 a 751.

El nuevo primer ministro calificó a su ejecutivo de "gobierno de salvación social", y afirmó con claridad que una de sus grandes prioridades del nuevo Gobierno será renegociar la deuda. Y además de pelear para que Grecia no pague a los acreedores, luchará contra la corrupción y la evasión fiscal, ayudará a las pymes y combatirá el desempleo.

"Tenemos un plan griego para hacer reformas sin incurrir en déficit, pero sin superávit primarios asfixiantes", dijo.

En su discurso de apertura de la sesión con los ministros, afirmó que aspira a "acabar con el clientelismo político y la corrupción" y aplicar las "reformas que no se han podido hacer durante 40 años".

"Estamos aquí para acabar con el clientelismo político y con la corrupción y para poner fin al Estado que funcionaba contra los intereses de la sociedad", dijo, para recalcar que la lucha contra la evasión fiscal será de máxima prioridad.

Además, buscará "el reinicio de la economía", ayudará a "las pequeñas empresas que están en riesgo de bancarrota" y fomentará una "política para reducir el desempleo". Tarea complicada, en un país que tiene la mayor tasa de paro de toda la Unión Europea.

"Este Gobierno es el primero de una nueva era. No tenemos derecho a cometer errores", afirmó, y añadió que su Ejecutivo tiene que devolver a los ciudadanos "la sensación de seguridad y de dignidad".

"No debemos olvidar que las expectativas del pueblo son muchas. No nos piden cambiarlo todo inmediatamente, pero nos piden trabajar sin respiro", subrayó. Y dará cuentas a diario ante la prensa de la actividad de su gobierno.

Y no sólo tiene Tsipras recetas para Grecia; también para Europa. En este sentido, el líder izquierdista afirmó que "Grecia está lista para contribuir a una solución para toda Europa", y celebró que para mañana mismo está prevista la visita del presidente del Parlamento Europeo, Martin Schulz, y el viernes la del el Eurogrupo, Jeroen Djisselbloem. "Las negociaciones con ellos serán muy útiles", aseguró.
Se acabó el pagar por ir al hospital

Poco a poco los ministros de Tsipras van concretando unas medidas de corte social que suenan bien... pero que nadie sabe cómo se van a pagar. No es suficiente decir que será gracias al dinero de la deuda y los intereses. Sobre todo cuando las medidas que propone supondrán un fuerte repunte del gasto público.

Otro de los que habló este miércoles fue el viceministro de Sanidad, Andreas Xanthos, quien afirmó que el gobierno dará acceso a todos los griegos al sistema público de salud. Una noticia importante para un país en el que 3 de cada 10 ciudadanos estaban excluidos del sistema público de salud por estar en el paro durante más de un año o tener deudas con la Seguridad Social en un periodo superior a doce meses.

Y no sólo eso; eliminarán los impuestos relacionados con la atención hospitalaria y las medicinas. Así, en adelante los griegos no tendrán que pagar cinco euros cada vez que acuden al hospital, ni tampoco el euro que tenían que pagar por comprar cada receta médica.

Xanthos busca así cumplir con su compromiso electoral, para lo cual aplicará "medidas inmediatas de socorro" que enfrenten "con urgencia la pobreza sanitaria" y garanticen el "acceso universal y sin excepciones de todos los ciudadanos sin seguro médico".

Y, en previsión de que haya más pacientes, y para atender la falta de recursos humanos que entienden que existe en el sistema, dan a entender que contratarán a más gente.

Los cambios también afectarán a la Seguridad Social. En este sentido, Xanthos destacó que es necesaria "una reorganización radical de la Seguridad Social, con la eliminación de la política de partidos, el amiguismo, la demanda artificial, el despilfarro y la corrupción" y apostó por restablecer "la ética social en los servicios de salud pública".
http://noticias.lainformacion.com/mundo/tsipras-presenta-su-gobierno-de-salvacion-social-entre-dudas-de-como-se-financiara_AyIWa15bhSQajVZlheVLS/?utm_source=LAINFO+-+Kit+buenos+d%C3%ADas&utm_campaign=10dc205616-inf29012015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_378063843d-10dc205616-181494177

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Enero 31st 2015, 12:38


Tsipras presenta su gobierno de "salvación social" entre dudas de cómo se financiará

David Iglesias

miércoles, 28/01/15 - 12:31
[ ]

El nuevo gobierno griego de la izquierdista Syriza paralizará "inmediatamente" las privatizaciones de las eléctricas y dará luz gratis a 300.000 hogares.
Se incrementa el salario mínimo en 125 euros, pasando de 586 a 751; los griegos dejarán de pagar cinco euros por ir al hospital. Tsipras aún tiene que explicar cómo pagará todo.

El Gobierno griego anuncia que mantendrá una reunión informativa diaria con la prensa

Alexis Tsipras ha empezado su gobierno de forma frenética. No han pasado ni 72 horas desde unas elecciones en las que los griegos provocaron un terremoto político y ya hay nuevo gobierno, unos ministros manos a la obra y una batería de medidas concretas sobre la mesa.

Algo inédito en una Grecia en la que durante muchos años se han hecho las cosas a "ritmo mediterráneo"; y quizá por eso un partido como Syriza haya llegado al poder, capitalizando el hartazgo de una Grecia cansada de la corrupción y del desgobierno de su país.

También te puede interesar: La paralización de la privatización de empresas públicas desploma la bolsa griega un 9,24%

Esta mañana el nuevo Ejecutivo de Tsipras ha reunido por primera vez a sus ministros, después de un día de cruce de declaraciones -respetuosas pero claras- entre Grecia y la Unión Europea.

En Atenas impera la tesis de que Grecia no puede pagar, y quiere que en Bruselas se hagan a la idea. Respeto por los tratados sí, pero no a los acuerdos alcanzados por el anterior gobierno, dice un Tsipras que con sus decisiones podría abrir la caja de los truenos comunitaria.

Mientras, desde Bruselas y Frankfurt muestran respeto por el nuevo gobierno de Tsipras pero le recuerdan sin ambages que Grecia seguirá necesitando financiación, y que la única forma de lograrlo es garantizando lo pactado hasta la fecha. Si no, ni un sólo euro más. Y va en serio; después de todo, países como España ya se han gastado con el país heleno cifras astronómicas que igualan a las prestaciones por desempleo... durante un año entero.

El primero en hacer declaraciones de alto voltaje fue el ministro de Reconstrucción Productiva, Medio Ambiente y Energía, Panayiotis Lafazanis, que este miércoles anunció que su gobierno paralizará "inmediatamente" todo proceso de privatización de las eléctricas. Este era un punto clave, en sintonía con la promesa electoral de ofrecer electricidad gratuita a los más pobres. Según anunció, 300.000 hogares se beneficiarán de la nueva medida.

También te puede interesar: Tsipras forma un equipo de Gobierno con diez ministros, ocho menos que Samarás

La ola privatizadora no sólo alcanzará a este sector. También a otros donde se estén planificando o ejecutando privatizaciones que vayan en contra de objetivos sociales, en clara alusión a puertos y aeropuertos. Pero sin concretar más, abriendo un cajón de sastre donde entran muchas cosas.

Fue el propio Tsipras quien, poco después, ahondó en este espíritu del que quiere revestir a su ejecutivo, en el que 'social' se apunta como el concepto clave y el tamiz por el cual pasarán todas las decisiones del nuevo gobierno. Así, el salario mínimo se incrementará en 125 euros, pasando de 586 a 751.

El nuevo primer ministro calificó a su ejecutivo de "gobierno de salvación social", y afirmó con claridad que una de sus grandes prioridades del nuevo Gobierno será renegociar la deuda. Y además de pelear para que Grecia no pague a los acreedores, luchará contra la corrupción y la evasión fiscal, ayudará a las pymes y combatirá el desempleo.

"Tenemos un plan griego para hacer reformas sin incurrir en déficit, pero sin superávit primarios asfixiantes", dijo.

En su discurso de apertura de la sesión con los ministros, afirmó que aspira a "acabar con el clientelismo político y la corrupción" y aplicar las "reformas que no se han podido hacer durante 40 años".

"Estamos aquí para acabar con el clientelismo político y con la corrupción y para poner fin al Estado que funcionaba contra los intereses de la sociedad", dijo, para recalcar que la lucha contra la evasión fiscal será de máxima prioridad.

Además, buscará "el reinicio de la economía", ayudará a "las pequeñas empresas que están en riesgo de bancarrota" y fomentará una "política para reducir el desempleo". Tarea complicada, en un país que tiene la mayor tasa de paro de toda la Unión Europea.

"Este Gobierno es el primero de una nueva era. No tenemos derecho a cometer errores", afirmó, y añadió que su Ejecutivo tiene que devolver a los ciudadanos "la sensación de seguridad y de dignidad".

"No debemos olvidar que las expectativas del pueblo son muchas. No nos piden cambiarlo todo inmediatamente, pero nos piden trabajar sin respiro", subrayó. Y dará cuentas a diario ante la prensa de la actividad de su gobierno.

Y no sólo tiene Tsipras recetas para Grecia; también para Europa. En este sentido, el líder izquierdista afirmó que "Grecia está lista para contribuir a una solución para toda Europa", y celebró que para mañana mismo está prevista la visita del presidente del Parlamento Europeo, Martin Schulz, y el viernes la del el Eurogrupo, Jeroen Djisselbloem. "Las negociaciones con ellos serán muy útiles", aseguró.
Se acabó el pagar por ir al hospital

Poco a poco los ministros de Tsipras van concretando unas medidas de corte social que suenan bien... pero que nadie sabe cómo se van a pagar. No es suficiente decir que será gracias al dinero de la deuda y los intereses. Sobre todo cuando las medidas que propone supondrán un fuerte repunte del gasto público.

Otro de los que habló este miércoles fue el viceministro de Sanidad, Andreas Xanthos, quien afirmó que el gobierno dará acceso a todos los griegos al sistema público de salud. Una noticia importante para un país en el que 3 de cada 10 ciudadanos estaban excluidos del sistema público de salud por estar en el paro durante más de un año o tener deudas con la Seguridad Social en un periodo superior a doce meses.

Y no sólo eso; eliminarán los impuestos relacionados con la atención hospitalaria y las medicinas. Así, en adelante los griegos no tendrán que pagar cinco euros cada vez que acuden al hospital, ni tampoco el euro que tenían que pagar por comprar cada receta médica.

Xanthos busca así cumplir con su compromiso electoral, para lo cual aplicará "medidas inmediatas de socorro" que enfrenten "con urgencia la pobreza sanitaria" y garanticen el "acceso universal y sin excepciones de todos los ciudadanos sin seguro médico".

Y, en previsión de que haya más pacientes, y para atender la falta de recursos humanos que entienden que existe en el sistema, dan a entender que contratarán a más gente.

Los cambios también afectarán a la Seguridad Social. En este sentido, Xanthos destacó que es necesaria "una reorganización radical de la Seguridad Social, con la eliminación de la política de partidos, el amiguismo, la demanda artificial, el despilfarro y la corrupción" y apostó por restablecer "la ética social en los servicios de salud pública".
http://noticias.lainformacion.com/mundo/tsipras-presenta-su-gobierno-de-salvacion-social-entre-dudas-de-como-se-financiara_AyIWa15bhSQajVZlheVLS/?utm_source=LAINFO+-+Kit+buenos+d%C3%ADas&utm_campaign=10dc205616-inf29012015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_378063843d-10dc205616-181494177

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Enero 31st 2015, 12:39


En un mes huyen de los bancos griegos 11.000 millones de euros

David Aragonés/ Alexia Acosta

jueves, 29/01/15 - 08:22
[ ]

Según Bloomberg en pocos días las entidades financieras griegas están sufriendo una fuga incluso mayor que la que se dio en lo peor de la crisis de deuda europea en 2012.
En diciembre pasado, los ciudadanos retiraron 3.000 millones de euros, una cifra que se ha disparado hasta los 11.000 millones en lo que va del mes.

El IBEX 35 pierde los 10.500 puntos, al bajar el 1,34 %, afectado por Grecia

El nuevo gobierno de Grecia empezó a enseñar sus cartas, prometiendo negociar con Bruselas una solución "viable" y "justa" al problema de su deuda, y parando varios proyectos de privatizaciones, a lo que la bolsa de Atenas reaccionó con una fuerte caída. No sólo a los mercados sino también a sus propios ciudadanos que han empezado a retirar dinero de los depósitos bancarios.

Los mercados se tomaron bastante mal los primeros anuncios y declaraciones del ejecutivo, y la bolsa de Atenas se dejó al cierre un 9,24%. Los más castigados fueron los bancos locales. El Banco del Pireo perdió 29,2%, Alpha un 26,7% y Eurobank un 25,9%. El rendimiento del bono griego a diez años, de referencia en el mercado, subió a 10,6%, frente al 9,476% de la víspera.

Según Bloomberg en pocos días las entidades financieras griegas están sufriendo una fuga incluso mayor que la que se dio en lo peor de la crisis de deuda europea en 2012. En diciembre pasado, los ciudadanos retiraron 3.000 millones de euros, una cifra que se ha disparado hasta los 11.000 millones en lo que va del mes.

Cabe recordar que en noviembre pasado, el sistema financiero tenía 164.000 millones de euros en depósitos, lo que significa que entre diciembre y enero la banca griega ha perdido el 8,5% del total de sus fondos. En consecuencia, esta salida deja al nivel de depósitos por debajo de lo registrado en 2012.

Revivir el problema de 2012

Los griegos no hacen más que empezar a revivir el 2012. Por ejemplo, únicamente en mayo de ese año, en plena crisis del euro, retiraron 5.000 millones. Los griegos todavía temen y ven real la amenaza de una suspensión de pagos. El escenario no parece tan lejano. Si dejara de llegar el dinero de la Troika y sin posibilidades de endeudarse en los mercados externos, el Estado no tardaría mucho en quedarse sin dinero para pagar facturas, nóminas o pensiones. Se avecinaría un derrumbe financiero con el 'corralito' en la sombra. Precisamente ahora, que lentamente el país sale de la recesión y hasta crea empleo.

Más allá de un 'corralito' y la imposibilidad de poder retirar fondos, si Grecia saliera del euro y volviera ha adoptar el dracma, se cumpliría una pesadilla para todo el que tenga una cuenta ahorro. Como explican desde Natxis, la paridad dracma-euro no se sostendría mucho tiempo. Calculan que en poco tiempo habría una devaluación del 50%, con el consiguiente aumento de precios en un país que es principalmente importador.

La agencia Fitch ya advirtió a finales de 2014 sobre los posibles escenarios y el riesgo de la fuga de capitales. "En primer lugar, un estancamiento prolongado (de las negociaciones) con la troika, combinado con la falta de acceso a los mercados, podría poner bajo presión la situación de caja del Gobierno hacia el verano, incluso suponiendo que el presupuesto se mantuviera bajo un estricto control", afirma la agencia de calificación de deuda.

El gobierno heleno, formado por Syriza (izquierda radical) y Griegos Independientes (derecha soberanista), exige a sus acreedores internacionales una renegociación de su deuda (175% del PIB) y de las medidas de austeridad aplicadas desde 2010 a cambio de dos rescates de un total de 240.000 millones de euros.

El objetivo, proclamó el nuevo ministro de Finanzas Yanis Varoufakis, es "pasar la página de la política de la austeridad", dictada por la troika de acreedores (UE, Banco Central Europeo y Fondo Monetario Internacional).

Christopher Dembik, economista de Saxo Banque, señaló que el verdadero problema de los bancos griegos, "dependientes de las inyecciones de liquidez de los acreedores internacionales", es que "no se ha hecho una verdadera reestructuración del sector, al contrario de lo que se hizo en España".

Después de seis años de recesión, Grecia volvió a crecer en 2014 (se espera un 0,6%), pero tiene un desempleo superior al 25%, el más alto de la Eurozona, y su PIB se redujo desde 2009 un 25%.

En diciembre, la Eurozona decidió prolongar dos meses el rescate, hasta finales de febrero. Para entonces prevé entregarle a Atenas los últimos 7.200 millones de euros pendientes, con la condición de que sigan las reformas y el estricto régimen presupuestario en vigor.
http://noticias.lainformacion.com/economia-negocios-y-finanzas/economia-general/en-un-mes-huyen-de-los-bancos-griegos-11-000-millones-de-euros_4z80tthL66MAdQe2OXvYw1/?utm_source=LAINFO+-+Kit+buenos+d%C3%ADas&utm_campaign=10dc205616-inf29012015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_378063843d-10dc205616-181494177

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Febrero 3rd 2015, 20:08


Russia is looking to make an ally within its biggest enemy

Elena Holodny

Feb. 3, 2015, 4:46 PM
14,264
29

facebook
linkedin
twitter
google+

Putin rifle gunRIA Novosti/APPutin, a former Soviet spy, knows the value of infiltrating the other side.

It looks like Russia is trying to make a military ally within its biggest enemy.

On Tuesday, Greece's defense minister and outspoken "Eurosceptic" Panos Kammenos announced that he was invited to Moscow to meet his Russian counterpart, Sergei Shoygu in the near future.

What's interesting here is that Greece is one of the 28 members of NATO, while Russia perceives NATO as its biggest threat.

Still, Russia appears to be courting Greece's defense minister. On Tuesday, Kammenos met with both the US and Russian ambassadors to Greece.

"The discussion with the ambassador of Russia, Mr. Maslov, was also about the pending agreements between the Ministries of National Defence of Greece and Russia, the capabilities of a strategic cooperation, the organisation of the year of Greek-Russian friendship in 2016 which will take place in Greece and in Russia. I received an invitation by Russia’s Minister of Defence to visit Moscow within the next period of time," Kammenos wrote on Greece's Ministry of National Defense website.

Συναντήσεις του ΥΕΘΑ @PanosKammenos με τους Πρέσβεις των Η.Π.Α & της Ρωσίας στην Ελλάδα http://t.co/IMpJYxLsgq pic.twitter.com/EPsa02HETv
— Vasilis Siriopoulos (@V_Siriopoulos) February 3, 2015

The new Greek government has on occasion been openly critical of both the EU and NATO.

Kammenos, (a noted devout Orthodox Christian, who is anti-immigration, and has expressed anti-Semitic and homophobic remarks), is the leader of the right-wing junior coalition partner in the radical-leftist Alexis Tsipras' Greek government. He has also garnered some attention because of his anti-EU rhetoric.

"The junior party is openly Euroscpetic and withering of the way international creditors have turned Greece into an 'occupied zone, a debt colony.' Its leader, Panos Kammenos, who has declared that Europe is governed by 'German neo-Nazis,' assumes the help of the defense ministry," reported The Guardian.

Most of Kammenos' criticisms are aimed at (unsurprisingly) Germany, which is seen as the driving force behind the austerity push. He even once said that Germany treats its European partners as "concubines."

"He is not anti-European, he is anti-EU. There's a difference," the president of the French anti-EU group Debout la France, Nicolas Dupont-Aignan, said.

syriza greece Defense Minister Panos KammenosREUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (C), Deputy Prime Minister Yannis Dragasakis (2nd L), Defense Minister Panos Kammenos (L), Interior and Administrative Reconstruction Minister Nikos Voutsis, Minister of Productive Reconstruction, Environment and Energy Panagiotis Lafazanis (2R) and other members of the new government pose for a group picture after the first meeting of the new cabinet in the parliament building in Athens January 28, 2015.

And it's not just Kammenos. Syriza, the Tsipras-led, radical leftist party that won the election, has also expressed some anti-NATO sentiments.

"On Nato, Syriza describes its approach as a 'multi-dimensional, pro-peace foreign policy for Greece, with no involvement in wars or military plans.' It seeks 'the re-foundation of Europe away from artificial divisions and Cold War alliances such as Nato.' ... Last year on Syriza MP called for Greece to leave Nato altogether, though the comments were rapidly played down by senior officials," writes BBC.

"The new Greek government is cause for concern, especially because Tsipras has voiced his opposition to NATO membership in the past," Ian Bremmer told Business Insider last week. "And his early actions — these comments regarding sanctions, as well as his meeting with the Russian ambassador to Greece without hours of taking office — demonstrates that he is willing to engage differently with Moscow."

And Greece has already caused a bit of a stir when it appeared that it might block the extension of sanctions against Russia following the escalation of violence in Ukraine, although analysts believe that Greece was using this as a bargaining chip against the EU, since, ultimately, Greece is negotiating for a debt write-off.

In any case, the signals from the Tsipras government have been decidedly pro-Russia.

"Greece and Cyprus can become a bridge of peace and cooperation between the EU and Russia," the new prime minister Tsipras reportedly said on Wednesday.

For Russia, this is just the latest news of a budding military alliance. Over the year, Russia has been increasing its military cooperation with non-NATO members, including China, India, North Korea, and Iran.

Although Greece is still a NATO member, Russia might be looking to leverage the fact that Greece's new leadership has been critical of NATO and the EU on occasion.
http://www.businessinsider.com/russias-is-looking-to-make-an-ally-within-its-biggest-enemy-2015-2

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Febrero 3rd 2015, 22:40


Suma Grecia el apoyo italiano

"Estoy convencido de que se dan las condiciones para alcanzar un punto de acuerdo entre Atenas y las instituciones europeas", dijo el Premier, Matteo Renzi, al finalizar el encuentro con Tsipras. Foto: Reuters
"Estoy convencido de que se dan las condiciones para alcanzar un punto de acuerdo entre Atenas y las instituciones europeas", dijo el Premier, Matteo Renzi, al finalizar el encuentro con Tsipras. Foto: Reuters
"Estoy convencido de que se dan las condiciones para alcanzar un punto de acuerdo entre Atenas y las instituciones europeas", dijo el Premier, Matteo Renzi, al finalizar el encuentro con Tsipras. Foto: Reuters

Irene Savio / Corresponsal
Roma, Italia (03 febrero 2015).-
Notas Relacionadas
Busca Grecia respaldo sobre deuda
Exigen a Grecia cumplir con deuda
No negociaremos con la troika.- Grecia
El Primer Ministro de Grecia, Alexis Tsipras, cosechó otro éxito al recibir el apoyo de Italia para lograr que la Unión Europea reduzca la presión sobre su país y se alcance un acuerdo sobre la alta deuda pública griega.

"Estoy fuertemente convencido de que se dan las condiciones para alcanzar un punto de acuerdo entre Atenas y las instituciones europeas", dijo Matteo Renzi, el Primer Ministro italiano, al finalizar el encuentro con Tsipras en Roma.

En esta línea, Renzi subrayó que la UE debe entender que de las urnas griegas salió el mensaje de toda una generación, la cual pide mayor atención a los más afectado por la crisis económica.

Por su parte, Tsipras recalcó que el objetivo final de Grecia es poner fin a las políticas de austeridad y que están trabajando para obtener un cambio en la UE.

"Hay que cambiar la política europea y poner fin a la austeridad. No queremos que exista una brecha entre norte y sur, sino que hay que retomar los intereses iniciales de la Unión Europea (UE) y crear un futuro de esperanza y dignidad", explicó.

Ambos reconocieron que Europa debe abandonar la política de austeridad y apostar por el crecimiento para acabar con la crisis de la deuda que asfixió a Grecia.
"El mundo le pide a Europa que invierta en el crecimiento y no en la austeridad", aseguró Renzi.

Además, las ideas para obtener un alivio significativo de la deuda del país, que representa el 175 por ciento del Producto Interno Bruto (PIB), ilustradas por los nuevos dirigentes griegos, fueron bien recibidas en Italia.

El apoyo de Italia llega después de que el Presidente francés, Francois Hollande, dijera que está dispuesto a una mediación para que la UE y Grecia encuentren un acuerdo, mientras que Alemania de momento se sigue mostrando hostil a cambios al rumbo actual.

A las reuniones en Roma también participó el Ministro de Finanzas griego, el economista estrella Yanis Varoufakis, quien se encontró con su homólogo italiano, Pier Carlo Padoan.

Hora de publicación: 18:34 hrs
http://www.reforma.com/aplicaciones/articulo/default.aspx?id=455645

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Febrero 5th 2015, 00:46


Presiona BCE a Grecia por acuerdo


El BCE señaló que los bancos griegos ya no podrán tener acceso a crédito de la institución del bloque utilizando bonos del Gobierno griego o bonos garantizados por el Gobierno. Foto: AFP

AP
Frankfurt, Alemania (04 febrero 2015).-
Notas Relacionadas
Quiere Atenas plan de reformas en 4 años
Suma Grecia el apoyo italiano
Busca Grecia respaldo sobre deuda
Exigen a Grecia cumplir con deuda
El Banco Central Europeo incrementó la presión financiera sobre el Gobierno de Grecia al retirar una crucial opción de préstamo para los bancos del país en momentos en que la nación está teniendo problemas para evitar el incumplimiento de pago sobre sus deudas y de quedar eliminado de la eurozona.

La acción subraya el papel clave que el BCE, la autoridad monetaria de las 19 naciones que utilizan la divisa compartida, está desempeñando en el drama griego.

El BCE señaló que los bancos griegos ya no podrán tener acceso a crédito de la institución del bloque utilizando bonos del Gobierno griego o bonos garantizados por el Gobierno.

El banco central había permitido la utilización de los bonos griegos, calificados como basura, como garantía porque el Gobierno estaba recibiendo apoyo financiero a través de un programa de rescate que expira el 28 de febrero.

El BCE indicó en un comunicado que las perspectivas de un nuevo acuerdo parecían inciertas.

Los bancos griegos podrían usar otros valores como garantía, pero los bonos gubernamentales y los bonos garantizados por el gobierno son de suma importancia para su capacidad de obtener el dinero que necesitan para mantenerse a flote.

El nuevo Gobierno griego ha rechazado las condiciones de austeridad adosadas a los préstamos del rescate financiero de 240 mil millones de euros por parte de otros Gobiernos de la eurozona y el Fondo Monetario Internacional, ya que, dice, los recortes han causado estragos en la economía.

Está buscando un nuevo acuerdo para evitar el incumplimiento de pagos y una posible salida del bloque de divisa compartida.

Los países acreedores, encabezados por Alemania, el miembro más fuerte de la zona del euro, han manifestado que no es posible condonar la deuda de Grecia y que esta nación debe apegarse a los acuerdos previos de recorte de déficit y retiro de regulaciones y burocracia que dañan el crecimiento.

La decisión anunciada el miércoles por el BCE acelera un cronograma ya lleno de tensión para que Grecia ordene sus problemas financieros adelantando la descalificación de bonos griegos al 11 de febrero, último día en que los bonos griegos pueden ser utilizados como garantía, en lugar del 28 de febrero, cuando tenía que expirar el viejo acuerdo de rescate.

La medida pone presión al Gobierno griego para que llegue a un compromiso con la llamada troika: el BCE, la Comisión Europea y el FMI. Grecia está siendo presionada para que promulgue reformas estructurales, como la venta de puertos, aeropuertos y otros activos propiedad del Estado para recaudar dinero que se destinaría a reducir la deuda del gobierno.

"El BCE le está señalando claramente al Gobierno de Grecia: Vas a tener que hablar con la troika y lograr un acuerdo'', afirmó Jacob Kirkegaard, del Peterson Institute for Interntional Economics.

"De no ser así, van a suceder cosas realmente malas'', agregó.
http://www.reforma.com/aplicaciones/articulo/default.aspx?id=456719

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Febrero 5th 2015, 00:47


Apoyan negociación de deuda griega



AFP
Atenas, Grecia (03 febrero 2015).-
Notas Relacionadas
Exigen a Grecia cumplir con deuda
No negociaremos con la troika.- Grecia
Critica Grecia sanciones a Rusia
Prioriza Grecia reestructurar deuda
Suprime Grecia 8 ministerios
Varios premios Nobel de economía y hasta Barack Obama han dado su apoyo a los postulados de las nuevas autoridades griegas de renegociar la deuda y enterrar la austeridad pero algunos advierten del efecto bola de nieve para Europa.

El nuevo Gobierno de Alexis Tsipras, del partido de izquierda radical Syriza, recibió el domingo un apoyo de peso: el mismísimo Presidente estadounidense.

"No se puede seguir exprimiendo a países que están en medio de una depresión", señaló Obama en la cadena de televisión CNN.

"En algún momento debe haber una estrategia de crecimiento para que pague sus deudas y eliminar parte de su déficit", agregó.

La deuda pública griega representa en torno al 175 por ciento de su Producto Interno Bruto (PIB).

Esto supone que tendría que consagrar durante casi dos años toda la riqueza que genera el país para reembolsarla.

Esta proporción asusta a los mercados e impide que Atenas acuda a los mercados de manera autónoma.

Tanto para Obama como para numerosos economistas, lo más eficaz para reducir este famoso ratio deuda/PIB es crecer económicamente con fuerza.

Y no consagrar cada año para pagar el servicio de la deuda el excedente primario duramente conseguido, como le han exigido los principales acreedores internacionales (Fondo Monetario Internacional y Estados europeos).

'Hacer sangrar a una piedra'


Exigir cada año a Atenas un superávit primario (que excluye el pago de la deuda) equivalente al 4.5 por ciento del PIB, a costa de sacrificios sociales, es "querer hacer sangrar a una piedra", escribió recientemente el premio Nobel de Economía Paul Krugman.

O imitar a Sísifo, este personaje mitológico condenado por haber desafiado a los dioses, a empujar hasta la eternidad una pesada piedra hasta la cumbre de una montaña, de la que rueda cada día.

"La buena estrategia para Sísifo es parar de empujar su piedra, no subirla hasta lo alto de la montaña", alega el Ministro de Finanzas griego Yanis Varoufakis el lunes en el diario francés Le Monde.

El FMI, que reconoce haber subestimado los efectos perniciosos de la austeridad presupuestaria, reconoció en junio que "mantener un superávit del 4 por ciento del PIB durante varios años podría resultar complicado".

El 22 de enero, tres días antes de la histórica victoria electoral de Syriza, 18 economistas de renombre, entre ellos los premio Nobel Joseph Stiglitz y Christopher Pissarides, pedían en el Financial Times "un nuevo inicio" para Grecia.

Reclamaban una "quita de la deuda, en particular la bilateral" (que debe Grecia a los Estados), una moratoria al pago de los intereses, "una cantidad significativa de dinero" para financiar grandes inversiones e importantes reformas en Grecia, sobre todo para consolidar la recaudación de impuestos.

Xavier Timbeau, del Observatorio Francés de Coyunturas Económicas, no es partidario de una "gran conferencia destinada a condonar una parte de la deuda griega", susceptible, según él, de suscitar reivindicaciones similares de España y de Portugal.

Pide que se incida más bien en los tipos de interés, "que representan cada año entre el 4.5 y el 5 por ciento del PIB de Grecia. Si se suprimiera totalmente esta carga durante varios años se podría hacer frente a la 'crisis humanitaria' de la que habla con bastante razón el Gobierno de Tsipras", señaló.

Grecia ya se beneficia de una moratoria de los intereses que adeuda al fondo europeo FEEF, que le prestó unos 140 mil millones de euros.

La deuda total del país supera los 315 mil millones de euros.

Otro dato que hace que los economistas sean partidarios de dar un respiro a Grecia, es la caída de los precios en el país, que tiende a aumentar la deuda con relación al PIB.

"Se necesitan 50 o 60 años para reembolsar el 200 por ciento del PIB" si no hay inflación, decía recientemente Thomas Piketty, autor del best seller de economía "El capital en el siglo 21" y partidario de una reestructuración de la deuda griega.

La economía griega lleva en deflación casi dos años.
Hora de publicación: 00:00 hrs.
http://www.reforma.com/aplicaciones/articulo/default.aspx?id=454800

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Febrero 5th 2015, 00:47


Quiere Atenas plan de reformas en 4 años



AFP
Bruselas, Bélgica (04 febrero 2015).- Grecia propuso a la UE un plan de reformas y financiación de cuatro años y llamó a la puerta del Banco Central Europeo en un intento de recabar ayuda de la institución y de la zona euro para evitar la quiebra del país.

Notas Relacionadas
Suma Grecia el apoyo italiano
Busca Grecia respaldo sobre deuda
Exigen a Grecia cumplir con deuda
Los nuevos dirigentes griegos prosiguieron este miércoles su gira europea por Fráncfort, Bruselas y París.

Luego de un encuentro en Bruselas con los presidentes de las tres instituciones de la Unión Europea, el primer ministro griego Alexis Tsipras viajó a París para reunirse con François Hollande.

"Grecia no es una amenaza para Europa", dijo Tsipras en París al término de un encuentro con el presidente francés, al que pidió que sea garante del crecimiento en la UE.

"Necesitamos hoy un acuerdo para Europa, un acuerdo para el regreso al crecimiento, para el refuerzo del empleo y de la cohesión social", instó Tsipras.

En paralelo, después de Roma, el Ministro de Finanzas griego, Yanis Varoufakis, viajó a Fráncfort, a la sede del Banco Central Europeo (BCE) para reunirse con el Presidente de la entidad, Mario Draghi, antes de un encuentro crucial el jueves con el titular de la cartera de Finanzas de Alemania, Wolfgang Schauble.

En Bruselas, Tispras propuso al presidente de la Comisión Europea, Jean-Claude Juncker, elaborar con la UE un plan de reformas y de financiamiento a cuatro años (2015-2018), según una fuente gubernamental en Atenas.

Este plan incluye un programa radical en materia de lucha contra la corrupción y el fraude fiscal, acompañado por un reequilibrio financiero de Grecia, que pasaría por abandonar la exigencia de conseguir un excedente primario del 4.5 por ciento de su Producto Interno Bruto (PIB).

La misma fuente en Atenas indicó que Tsipras evocó la posibilidad de un acuerdo transitorio que dé a Grecia margen financiero para preparar, de común acuerdo con la UE, este plan.

La Comisión no hizo ningún comentario. En Bruselas, la gira europea y las reuniones que se suceden con los dirigentes griegos comienzan a causar hastío.

"Si se trata de dividir, no es bueno", confió una fuente europea.

"Las negociaciones van a ser difíciles, van a necesitar cooperación, así como el importante esfuerzo de Grecia", subrayó el Presidente del Consejo Europeo, Donald Tusk.

País quebrado


En Fráncfort, al término de más de una hora en la sede de la institución monetaria, Varoufakis se declaró optimista ante el futuro tras mantener una discusión fructífera con el presidente del BCE.

En una entrevista con el semanario alemán Die Zeit, Varoufakis, que reconoce ser Ministro de Finanzas de un Estado en quiebra, aseguró que el BCE tiene que apoyar a los bancos griegos para que el país pueda mantener la cabeza fuera del agua.

La institución es vital para impedir que Grecia quiebre.

Los bancos del país son los principales clientes de la deuda griega. Y es esencialmente el BCE, a través de dos mecanismos de préstamos, el que les inyecta liquidez. El Consejo de Gobernadores de la institución podría escoger no renovar uno de los préstamos.

Por su parte, el Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI) afirmó que no hay discusión con Atenas sobre una renegociación de su deuda.

En una entrevista publicada el miércoles, Varoufakis indicó que había comenzado las negociaciones con el FMI para reemplazar sus títulos de deuda existentes por títulos más recientes a tasas de mercad y cuyo vencimiento estaría vinculado a un regreso de un crecimiento sólido en el país.

Atenas, que colocó este miércoles más de 800 millones de euros en deuda a corto plazo -aunque a tasas más altas y con menos interés de los inversores -, reclama un financiamiento puente hasta el 1 de junio, fecha en la que espera haber llegado a un acuerdo con la UE.

Varoufakis prometió presentar propuestas concretas en la reunión de ministros de Finanzas de la zona euro, que se prevé se lleve a cabo el 11 de febrero en Bruselas, la víspera de la cumbre de jefes de Estado y de Gobierno comunitarios.
Hora de publicación: 15:02 hrs.
http://www.reforma.com/aplicaciones/articulo/default.aspx?id=456399

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Febrero 14th 2015, 00:38


People in Greece put off paying taxes in January and that could hurt chances for a new deal
Reuters

Lefteris Papadimas, Reuters

Feb. 12, 2015, 10:43 AM


greece Yannis Behrakis/ReutersA woman holds a Greek flag as she takes part in an anti-austerity pro-government demonstration in front of the parliament in Athens February 11, 2015.
See Also
Greek finance minister: Athens is 'absolutely not' leaving the euro zone
Europe's finance ministers very nearly agreed to this provisional deal on Greece
Greek finance minister enters the lions' den

Greece's tax revenues slumped 23 percent below target in January as citizens held off on paying taxes before a snap election, marking a setback for the new left-wing government as it seeks a deal with European partners to avert a financial crisis.

Finance ministry data showed tax revenues were 3.49 billion euros in January, about 1 billion euros below the target of 4.54 billion set under Greece's latest budget.

The grim data adds to concern about Greece's finances as time runs out for the government, which won the Jan. 25 election, to bridge wide differences with European partners before its bailout deal expires at the end of this month.

January's dive in revenues was largely driven by Greeks holding off before the vote in the belief that a government led by the radical Syriza party would abolish some unpopular measures such as the ENFIA property tax.

Athens says its financing needs are manageable while it negotiates a deal, and has not said how long it can survive without fresh aid.

The government said it was confident of recouping the shortfall. "There are tax obligations that have been delayed and we are sure that we will collect them in the coming months," Deputy Finance Minister Dimitris Mardas told Reuters.

Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras's government has outlined plans to replace the property tax with a new levy on high-end property from next year. But another deputy finance minister, Nadia Valavani, told parliament on Tuesday: "We are asking all citizens who want this government to implement its policies ... to pay the last installment of the ENFIA property tax for February and the previous one for January."

The poor tax collection data helped to push Greece's central government administration surplus also below target.

This excludes the budgets of social security organizations and local administrations and is different from the figure monitored by Greece's EU/IMF lenders, but indicates the country's progress in repairing its finances.

The surplus was 443 million euros in January, well short of the 1.37 billion euro budget projection.

(Additional reporting by Stephen Grey, Writing by Deepa Babington; editing by David Stamp)
http://www.businessinsider.com/greeces-tax-revenues-slumped-23-below-target-in-january-2015-2

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Febrero 18th 2015, 02:31



Politics More: Greece Eurogroup
Europe may be just 2 words away from a deal on Greece

Tomas Hirst

Feb. 17, 2015, 5:04 AM
13,024
27

facebook
linkedin
twitter
google+

varoukant 4*3Stefano Pozzebon/Business Insider, Carsten Koall/Getty Images, Wikimedia CommonsYanis Varoufakis who has Immanuel Kant on his mind.

On Monday The New York Times published an opinion article by Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis that outlined numerous "red lines" he was not prepared to cross in negotiations with his European partners. Monday's failure to agree on an extension of Greece's bailout programme may suggest the Eurogroup does not understand what those "red lines" mean and how close the two sides are to a deal.

In fact, they may be within just two words of a deal.

Here's the line that everyone (including Business Insider) quoted from Varoufakis' article:

The lines that we have presented as red will not be crossed. Otherwise, they would not be truly red, but merely a bluff.

This looks as if Greece is refusing to compromise on issues such as whether to repay its creditors in full (something the Eurogroup is strongly pushing for). But, as they say, context is everything.

Here's the quote people should have included:

How do we know that our modest policy agenda, which constitutes our red line, is right in Kant's terms? We know by looking into the eyes of the hungry in the streets of our cities or contemplating our stressed middle class, or considering the interests of hard-working people in every European village and city within our monetary union. After all, Europe will only regain its soul when it regains the people's trust by putting their interests centre-stage.

This is the crucial passage of the article, and it paints a very, very different picture to the one sketched above. The "red lines" here are not technical discussions of Greek debt forgiveness, but humanitarian concerns. That is, Varoufakis is saying he will not compromise on the commitments of Syriza, the lead party in Greece, to help the poor and the hungry in Greece and indeed across the eurozone.

This paints a very different picture of where Greek negotiators stand and a much more optimistic one. These are the Greek government's demands for a final agreement with its eurozone partners, as leaked to the media in advance:

They propose 30% of the memorandum of understanding between Greece and the troika (European Commission, International Monetary Fund, and European Central Bank) agreed to in 2012 be scrapped in exchange for a commitment to 10 new reforms agreed with the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).
Reduce Greece's primary government budget surplus target, equal to 3% of GDP for this year, to 1.49%.
Reduce Greek debt through a debt-swap plan in which outstanding debt is converted into either GDP-linked bonds, in which the interest rates are linked to Greece's economic growth, and "perpetual bonds" that have no formal expiry date but whose amount can be called back by the holder at any time.
Introduce measures to ease the country's "humanitarian crisis" as announced by Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras on Sunday. These include a rise in the minimum wage and the payment of a bonus to low-income pensioners.

Varoufakis' "red line" can easily be read as relating only to the (relatively) uncontroversial point that the Syriza-led government wants to be given space to address Greece's humanitarian crisis. This is separate from the more difficult points relating to the detail of the country's reform programme, where the divisions within the Eurogroup are widest.

But most importantly, the four points above are not the terms being negotiated. Instead, Greece is asking the Eurogroup only for a short-term loan that will allow the country to continue discussions over the next few months without running out of money.

As such what they need from these talks is an acknowledgement in principle that the terms of the 2012 memorandum are open to renegotiation and the right not to pre-commit to terms that would tie their hands in those negotiations.

So how close are we to such a deal? Greece would have accepted this draft agreement simply because it contained a line that says, "We also agreed that the IMF would continue to play its role in the new arrangement." Those last two words, emphasis added, are crucial.

Here's what Eurogroup president Jeroen Dijsselbloem said Monday night after that effort fell apart (emphasis added):

yes, there is a flexibility in the program; we are open to discuss the replacing measures, but not by taking unilateral actions;
a request to come with the commitment not to roll back any measures, unless agreed with the institutions and unless fully funded;
a request should come with an unequivocal commitment from Greece to honour all financial obligations to its creditors and of course to assure stability in the financial sector;
on the basis of such an extended program, within which flexibility is possible should be also the commitment for the Greek authorities to successfully conclude the program. We should have the reassurance that that is the intention;
any request should be on the basis of the commitment to work closely and to continue the dialogue with the institutions and the Eurogroup.

On this basis, the current stumbling block is clear — Greece does not want to pre-commit to "honour all financial obligations to its creditors" within the current programme. This explains why Greece rejected Monday's final Eurogroup draft out of hand as it explicitly called for Greece to honour "the agreed framework."

Yet, as Mike Bird points out, there were rumours that the Greek side were willing to sign off on an earlier version of the statement simply because it included the words "new arrangement."

So that might well be all it takes to reach a provisional deal here — two words. And perhaps the removal of "all" from Dijsselbloem's outline above.http://www.businessinsider.com/europe-is-much-closer-to-a-deal-on-greece-than-people-think-2015-2?nr_email_referer=1&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_content=PoliticsSelect



__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Febrero 18th 2015, 02:32


Greece's radical new leftist government wants an old conservative to be the country's president

Mike Bird

Feb. 17, 2015, 10:22 AM
907
2

facebook
linkedin
twitter
google+

Greek Prime minister Alexis TsiprasREUTERS/Yannis Behrakis Greek Prime minister Alexis Tsipras reacts before a swearing in ceremony for Greece's new lawmakers in the Greek parliament in Athens February 5, 2015.

New Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras just announced that former centre-right minister Prokopis Pavlopoulos is the government's nominee for president.

Pavlopoulos was a minister under New Democracy between 2004 and 2009.

That might seem like an odd choice, but it makes sense in the same way that far-left Syriza's coalition with the right-wing Independent Greeks makes sense. Tsipras wants to concentrate on ending Greece's bailout and doesn't want any distractions.

So if supporting a centre-right candidate for the presidency puts one less thing on his plate (since conservative lawmakers will vote with him, not against him) it's a good idea.

The presidential elections are coming round because the previous Greek government failed to get its candidate elected, which actually sparked the whole general election that let Syriza into power in the first place. Tsipras, understandably, doesn't want anything like that to happen to him.

Though this time, the parliament will be able to appoint a president with a simple majority (151) of Greece's 300 MPs. Previously, 180 votes were needed.
http://www.businessinsider.com/greece-alexis-tsipras-prokopis-pavlopoulos-presidential-candidate-2015-2?nr_email_referer=1&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_content=PoliticsSelect

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por ivan_077 el Febrero 26th 2015, 12:24


Grecia obtiene el aprobado del Eurogrupo manteniendo privatizaciones y frenando el salario mínimo

Alexia Acosta / Agencias

martes, 24/02/15 - 15:46
[ ]

Los ministros de Finanzas de la zona euro y la troika (ahora, las instituciones) han aprobado la lista de reformas presentada por el Gobierno heleno.
Le queda pasar la votación de los parlamentos de Alemania, Finlandia y Holanda, para dar por extendido durante cuatro meses la asistencia financiera.

El Tesoro coloca 4.172 millones en bonos y obligaciones con los intereses en mínimos

Los ministros de Economía dan el visto bueno a la lista de reformas de Grecia, aunque señalan que se trata únicamente de un punto de partida.

Antes de que iniciara la reunión, Bruselas ya había hecho público que consideraba que el texto remitido por el ministro griego de economía, Yannis Varoufakis, suponía un "punto de partida válido" para el acuerdo.

Por su lado, la Canciller alemana, Angela Merkel, se reunió con sus diputados de cara a la votación clave del parlamento alemán (para dar su aprobación), y aseguró que aunque apoya la prolongación del programa de ayuda a Grecia, "el trabajo" para sacar al país de la crisis "no acabó en absoluto".

Y es que se trata de una primera lista de medidas que el Gobierno heleno deberá "especificar más y pactar" con las instituciones de aquí a que acabe el mes de abril, ha explicado el Eurogrupo en su comunicado. Atenas y las instituciones tienen ahora hasta "finales de abril" para concretar y "profundizar" las medidas.
Se mantienen las privatizaciones ya acordadas

La lista de reformas transmitida a Bruselas por el gobierno griego contiene numerosas medidas para mejorar la eficacia en materia fiscal, pero sin precisar el impacto financiero que tendrán.

También prevé "revisar" el programa de privatizaciones aún no puestas en marcha y mantiene el compromiso de aumentar el salario mínimo en Grecia, sin precisar el calendario ni el nivel de subida. Sin embargo, las privatizaciones que ya se llevaron a cabo se mantendrán. Las previstas habrán de ser "examinadas con el objetivo de que el Estado obtenga beneficios máximos a largo plazo".

El documento insiste en varias ocasiones en la "concertación con las instituciones" (Comisión Europea, Banco Central Europeo y Fondo Monetario Internacional) a la hora de elaborar en detalle sus proyectos, las mismas instituciones que el gobierno de Alexis Tsipras quería alejar de su país tras ganar las elecciones.
Retrasa la subida del salario mínimo

"La amplitud y el calendario" del aumento del salario mínimo, una promesa importante de Tsipras, "se harán consultando" a sindicatos, organizaciones patronales e "instituciones europeas e internacionales", con el fin de "preservar la competitividad y las perspectivas de empleo". La suma prevista (751 euros) y la fecha (2016) no figuran explícitamente en la lista.

El gobierno griego se compromete a realizar "importantes esfuerzos" contra la evasión fiscal, "usando plenamente los medios electrónicos y otras innovaciones tecnológicas", con el fin de que los más ricos "participen de modo justo en el financiamiento de las políticas públicas (...) sin impacto negativo sobre la justicia social".

Se reformará el código fiscal y se reforzará la independencia de la administración central en materia de impuestos, brindándole mayores recursos.

El gobierno prevé luchar contra el contrabando de gasolina y cigarrillos y reforzar la lucha contra la corrupción, en el marco de un "Plan Nacional contra la Corrupción", así como reducir el blanqueo de dinero.

Ante la "crisis humanitaria", Atenas quiere mejorar la cobertura social de los más pobres y permitirles tener energía, alimentos y vivienda, usando por ejemplo bonos de alimentación.

También planea despenalizar la falta de pago de las personas endeudadas cuando se trata de pequeñas cantidades de dinero, apoyar a los "más vulnerables" que no pueden pagar los préstamos y colaborar con los bancos para "evitar las subastas" de las casas en las que viven las personas "por debajo de determinado umbral" de deuda sin reembolsar.

El número de ministerios del gobierno pasará de 16 a 10 y se reducirán las remuneraciones de los ministros, parlamentarios y altos funcionarios.

El gobierno procura "eliminar la presión social y política" que lleva muchos griegos a parar de trabajar y acogerse a una prejubilación, en particular tomando medidas de "apoyo" para "los asalariados que tienen entre 50 y 65 años de edad".

A continuación se resumen las principales medidas enunciadas en la carta de tres páginas enviada al Eurogrupo

POLÍTICA FISCAL

- Tributación

Reformar el sistema del IVA y su gestión. "Se harán fuertes esfuerzos para mejorar la recaudación y la lucha contra la evasión", utilizando medios electrónicos y innovaciones tecnológicas.

Se apuesta por "racionalizar" la aplicación de este impuesto con la "simplificación" de los tipos de forma que "se maximicen los ingresos actuales sin que haya un impacto negativo en la justicia social".Se limitarán las exenciones y se eliminarán los descuentos "irracionales".

Modificarán la fiscalidad de la de inversión colectiva (las SICAV en España) y la renta por gastos fiscales, e integrar ambos en el impuesto sobre la renta general.

Ampliar la definición de fraude fiscal y evasión para terminar con la inmunidad fiscal.
Modernizar el impuesto sobre la renta y eliminar exenciones, sustituyéndolas cuando sea necesario con medidas que favorezcan la justicia social.


- Finanzas públicas

Enmendar la actual Ley Orgánica Presupuestaria para mejorar la gestión de las finanzas, por ejemplo, clarificando y mejorando el control y la asunción de responsabilidades, y modernizando y acelerando los procedimientos de pagos.

Diseñar y aplicar una estrategia para aclarar los atrasos en los pagos, las refinanciaciones y las reclamaciones de pensiones.
Activar el hasta ahora inactivo Consejo Fiscal.

Modernizar las administraciones tributaria y de aduanas con la asistencia técnica disponible, para hacerlas más abiertas y transparentes.
Reforzar la independencia de la Secretaría General de Ingresos Públicos, dotándola del personal y los medios suficientes, en particular, en sus departamentos dedicados a los mayores deudores y las grandes fortunas.

Aumentar las inspecciones y las auditorías.

- Gasto público

Revisar y controlar el gasto en "todas las áreas del Gobierno".

Identificar posibles ahorros en cada línea de gasto de cada ministerio y racionalizar los gastos que no se dedican a salarios ni a pensiones, y que ahora absorben el 56% del total de gasto público.
Controlar el gasto sanitario y mejorar la dotación y calidad de los servicios médicos, al tiempo que se garantiza el acceso universal a la sanidad.

- Reforma de la Seguridad Social

Trabajar con medidas que unifiquen y simplifiquen la política de pensiones.

Eliminar incentivos que provocan "un porcentaje excesivo" de prejubilaciones, "especialmente, en la banca y el sector público".
Consolidar los fondos de pensiones para reducir su coste.

Se proporcionará asistencia específica a los trabajadores de entre 50 y 65 años que reciben la renta básica, con el objetivo de eliminar la presión social y política para que se prejubilen, con el consiguiente peso en los fondos de las pensiones.

- Administración pública y corrupción.

"Convertir la lucha contra la corrupción en una prioridad nacional".

Perseguir el contrabando de combustible y tabaco, monitorizar los precios de las importaciones y combatir el blanqueo de capitales.
Reducir el número de ministerios (de 16 a 10) y los asesores especiales del Gobierno.

Endurecer la legislación sobre financiación de partidos políticos e introducir topes máximos a sus préstamos.

Activar la legislación actual (hasta ahora "durmiente") que regula los medios de comunicación, asegurando entre otras cosas, "que pagan los precios de mercado establecidos por las frecuencias que utilizan".
Establecer un marco institucional a tiempo real, electrónico y transparente para las adjudicaciones públicas.

Reformar el sistema salarial del sector público para "descomprimir la distribución de salarios mediante pagos por productividad y políticas adecuadas de contratación, sin reducir las actuales bases salariales y al tiempo que se garantiza que no aumenta el gasto salarial total".
Racionalizar los complementos no salariales, con el objetivo de reducir el gasto total sin poner en peligro al funcionamiento del sector público.

Mejorar los mecanimos de contratación, "impulsando los nombramientos directivos basados en los méritos, la valoración de las plantilla con evaluaciones reales y un proceso justo para maximizar la movilidad de los recursos humanos".

ESTABILIDAD FINANCIERA

-Busca mejorar la legislación sobre pagos de atrasos tributarios y de la seguridad social. Además quiere fijar un sistema calibrado de cobros, que discrimine entre quiebras o impagos estratégicos e impagos por incapacidad real, para perseguir civil y penalmente aquellos casos que lo merezcan. Se pretende también ofrecer una oportunidad de sobrevivir a las empresas o particulares potencialmente solventes, al tiempo que se refuerza la responsabilidad social y una cultura adecuada del pago de las deudas. También propone discriminalizar a los deudores con ingresos más bajos y deudas pequeñas.

-Establece que los bancos deben actuar según los principios comerciales del sector. Además, utilizará el fondo de rescate destinado a la banca griega -"en colaboración con el BCE y la Comisión Europea- para asegurarse de que juega su papel para asegurar la estabilidad del sector y permitir los préstamos.

- Sobre los desahucios, "colaborará con los bancos y las instituciones para, durante el período inmediato, evitar subastas de la primera vivienda cuando la familia esté por debajo de un determinado umbral, al tiempo que se castiga a los que quiebran por estrategia".

POLÍTICAS PARA PROMOVER EL CRECIMIENTO

- Privatizaciones y gestión de los activos públicos.

No dar marcha atrás en las privatizaciones ya completadas, "donde el Gobierno haya lanzado el consurso se respetará el proceso de acuerdo con la ley". Se garantizará que las empresas privatizadas proporcionan los servicios y bienes públicos "de acuerdo con los objetivos de la política nacional y en cumplimiento de la legislación de la UE".

Se revisará el proceso de privatización en aquellos casos que no se haya iniciado, "con el objetivo de mejorar las condiciones para maximizar los beneficios del Estado a largo plazo, generar ingresos, incentivar la competencia en los sectores del país, promover la recuperación de la economía nacional y estimular el crecimiento a largo plazo".



- Reformas del mercado laboral

Extender y desarrollar el actual sistema que proporciona empleo temporal a los parados, "de acuerdo con los agentes sociales y siempre que el margen fiscal lo permita", y mejorar los programas de políticas activas de empleo para actualizar las capacidades de los desempleados de larga duración.

Poner en marcha de forma gradual una nueva negociación colectiva "que equilibre la necesidad de flexibilidad con la justicia". Así, pretende simplificar y aumentar en varias fases el salario mínimo, "de forma que se salvaguarden la competitividad y las perspectivas de creación de empleo".

Las modificaciones del salario mínimo se decidirán "en consultas con los agentes sociales y las instituciones europeas e internacionales, incluyendo la OIT", y teniendo en cuenta la opinión de un nuevo organismo independiente que analizará si los cambios salariales están en línea con la productividad y la competitividad conseguidas.

- Reformas del mercado

Para mejorar el clima para los negocios y la inversión, se eliminarán barreras a la competencia, según los consejos de la OCDE.

Se reducirán las trabas administrativas en línea con las pautas que indique esa Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económico. Se prohibirá, por ejemplo, a la administración que solicite a empresas o particulares información o documentos que el Estado ya posee.

Mejorar la gestión del territorio, incluyendo la planificación del espacio, el uso de la tierra y la finalización de un registro adecuado de la propiedad.
Eliminar restricciones injustificadas y desproporcionadas de las profesiones reguladas, "como parte de una estrategia global para combatir intereses creados".
Alinear la regulación de los mercados de electricidad y gas con "las prácticas de la UE".

-Reformas del sistema judicial

Mejorar la organización de los juzgados con una mayor especialización y, "en ese contexto, adoptar un nuevo Código Civil".
Promover la digitalización de las normas y los códigos, y el sistema electrónico para presentar demandas.

CRISIS HUMANITARIA

"Afrontar las necesidades surgidas por el reciente aumento de la pobreza (acceso insuficiente a la alimentación, a una vivienda, a los servicios sanitarios y al suministro básico de energía) mediante medidas diferentes al dinero y muy dirigidas a colectivos específicos".

"Asegurar que la lucha contra la crisis humanitaria no tiene efectos fiscales negativos".
noticias.lainformacion.com/mano-deobra/salarios-y-pensiones/grecia-obtiene-el-aprobado-del-eurogrupo-manteniendo-privatizaciones-y-frenando-el-salario-minimo_LwvjbfKos6YGeluhtEzPH5/?utm_source=LAINFO+-+Kit+buenos+días&utm_campaign=00289cdce5-inf25022015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_378063843d-00289cdce5-181494177

__________________________________________________________________________________________________
"No hay mas diferencia entre los hombres que el vicio o la virtud" Jose Maria Morelos y Pavon.

No hay raza inferior; solo hay sujetos inferiores
Bendita se la muerte, porque a nadie le concede lo que no les da a todos los demas;alabada sea la muerte que se yergue piadosa ante el hombre que ha cumplido su deber.
avatar
ivan_077
Staff

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 7902
Fecha de inscripción : 14/11/2010

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por szasi el Junio 21st 2015, 23:38

Anti-austerity protesters return to streets as Greek PM flies to Brussels
RSS Feedback Print Copy URL Large image More English.news.cn | 2015-06-22 01:11:23 | Editor: Tian Shaohui
Anti-austerity protesters returned to the streets of Athens on Sunday evening as Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras was due to travel back to Brussels with an updated counter proposal for a debt deal to address the Greek debt crisis.
People participate in an anti-austerity rally in front of Greek Parliament, Athens, June 21, 2015. Anti-austerity protesters returned to the streets of Athens on Sunday evening as Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras was due to travel back to Brussels with an updated counter proposal for a debt deal to address the Greek debt crisis. (Xinhua/Marios Lolos)

ATHENS, June 21 (Xinhua) -- Anti-austerity protesters returned to the streets of Athens on Sunday evening as Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras was due to travel back to Brussels with an updated counter proposal for a debt deal to address the Greek debt crisis.

The Leftist leader held a round of telephone contacts on Sunday with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande.

He briefed them on the Greek revised draft for "a mutually beneficial agreement that will give a definite solution to the issue," an announcement issued by his office said.

In parallel, Tsipras briefed the cabinet during a five-hour meeting on the content of the talks with the European leaders, according to the announcement.

On Monday evening the Greek leader will make another critical attempt to seal a deal during an emergency EU summit, as the June 30 deadline that could mark the countdown to default and Grexit or a new start to lead Greece to economic recovery nears.

European officials and analysts have suggested Monday's talks could be Greece's last opportunity for a deal.

An extraordinary Eurogroup meeting will pave the way earlier on Monday afternoon for the leaders' talks.

According to the latest opinion survey released by Avgi (Dawn) newspaper during the weekend 62 percent of Greeks said that the government should not make more concessions at the end of the five month negotiations with lenders on the terms of the disbursement of further aid.

On the other hand, 34 percent said that the Greek side should give more ground and not risk a dangerous rift with creditors in order to keep Greece in the euro zone and the EU at any sacrifice.

A part of the anti-compromise and anti-austerity respondents joined a fresh rally staged by the public sector trade union ADEDY in front of the parliament on Sunday.

"Democracy cannot be blackmailed," was again the main slogan of protesters who were supported by the ruling Radical Left SYRIZA party.

"Workers, unemployed, youth, Greek people and the other European citizens send a strong message of resistance to the austerity drive... We fight for our lives and our children's future, for a Europe of Democracy and solidarity," said a party announcement.

"Greece's battle against austerity is a battle for the entire European Union," said Greek government spokesman Gavriil Sakellaridis.

He welcomed a wave of rallies in solidarity with Greece organized across European capitals, from London and Paris to Berlin and Rome these days.

Similar slogans were chanted during the previous anti-austerity gathering held last Wednesday in Athens.

This rally was followed by a pro-euro demonstration backed by opposition parties on Thursday that will be repeated on Monday evening.

On the eve of the new crucial talks in Brussels the climate seems to have changed in comparison to last week's collapse of negotiations that was followed by unprecedented ultimatums to Athens.

European officials publicly warned that the game was almost over and this week Greece will either clinch an agreement or head to bankruptcy.

Greek State Minister Nikos Pappas appeared upbeat during an interview with a Greek daily this weekend that a "solution that will help Greece return to growth in the euro zone" will be reached.

Athens' updated proposal today falls short by about one billion euros of creditor demands to cover the fiscal gap until 2017 and talks focus on additional emergency taxation and defense spending cuts, according to Greek media reports citing government sources.

In its last counter proposal which comes after a long exchange of draft proposals from both sides in the past few weeks, the Greek government is said to have made more concessions on the thorny issue of early retirements.

Amidst scenarios that capital controls could be imposed as soon as this week, if Monday's talks end fruitless, depositors were queuing at bank branches and in front of ATMs even during the weekend withdrawing up to one billion euros on a daily basis, according to banking sector estimates.

"This hysteria cannot be justified. Greece pulled off miracles during the last two centuries with drachma," Deputy Minister of Culture Nikos Xydakis said in an interview this weekend.

"Currency is nothing but a tool... Europe existed long before the euro and will continue to be there after euro... What is important for us is what is the best outcome for Greek people," he argued.
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2015-06/22/c_134345023.htm
avatar
szasi
Inspector [Policia Federal]
Inspector [Policia Federal]

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 214
Fecha de inscripción : 01/06/2015

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por Lanceros de Toluca el Junio 24th 2015, 00:16

Esto se pondrá bien interesante. Yo digo que Grecia no saldrá de la Eurozona pero probablemente el gobierno de Zipras si sera echado

Lanceros de Toluca
Alto Mando
Alto Mando

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 19875
Fecha de inscripción : 25/07/2008 Edad : 96

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Defensa-M%C3%A9xico/3631280304218

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por Lanceros de Toluca el Junio 29th 2015, 20:00

Alexis Tsipras: Grecia no pagará deuda al FMI

El primer ministro heleno habló con la televisión pública de su país, señalando que no habrá pago en la medida que no haya acuerdo con los acreedores.

Lo dijo un funcionario citado por la agencia Reuters temprano en la tarde: Grecia no pagará su deuda de 1.600 millones de euros al Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI). Lo reiteró más tarde el ministro de Finanzas de Alemania, Wolfgang Schäuble, en entrevista con el canal de TV ARD y en horas de la noche de este lunes (29.06.2015) lo confirmó finalmente el premier griego Alexis Tsipras: Grecia no pagará.

Tsipras, eso sí, matizó: si llega a un acuerdo con los acreedores a lo largo de la noche, ese escenario podría cambiar. Pero para que algo así sucediera, tendría que haber un milagro. En horas de la tarde las autoridades de la Unión Europea ya habían rechazado cualquier extensión del programa de rescate para Atenas y la canciller alemana Angela Merkel descartó reuniones antes del referéndum griego del lunes, por carecer de sentido un encuentro sin tener los resultados de las votaciones a la vista.

La incierta devolución de la deuda

Tsipras preguntó en su entrevista “¿cómo podría Grecia pagar al FMI si nuestros bancos están siendo sofocados?”, y añadió que sea cual sea el resultado de las votaciones convocadas para el domingo, donde será la ciudadanía la que decida si el país acepta o rechaza las condiciones impuestas por los acreedores internacionales, su gobierno lo respetará. En la entrevista con el canal ERT, dejó entrever que un triunfo del “sí” podría significar su renuncia al cargo.

Tsipras “destruyó la confianza”

Llamando abiertamente a votar “no” para “alcanzar un acuerdo viable”, Tsipras mostró su convicción de que el lunes 6 de julio las negociaciones se reanudarán. “Vamos a sobrevivir y vamos a elegir nuestro futuro”, apuntó el primer ministro, quien aseguró que luchó e hizo “todo lo posible para lograr un acuerdo justo”, pero éste nunca llegó. La opinión del ministro Schäuble es distinta: para él, el gobierno de Syriza “destruyó toda confianza y con ello sacó todo fundamento al programa actual”, pese a lo cual “seguimos dispuestos a ayudar al pueblo griego”.

Los ministros de Finanzas de la eurozona han dicho reiteradamente que Grecia no tendría los fondos para pagar al FMI, a menos que se alcance un acuerdo con los acreedores para desbloquear 7.200 millones de euros congelados durante la negociación de ambas partes por las condiciones que se exigían a Atenas para obtener ayuda. Las conversaciones se rompieron el fin de semana, generando la imposición de controles de capitales a los bancos griegos.

El incumplimiento del pago llevaría a Grecia más cerca de una salida de la zona del euro si provoca que el Banco Central Europeo (BCE) corte la financiación de emergencia de la que dependen los bancos griegos. Políticos europeos han advertido a los griegos de que un triunfo del “no” al paquete de ayuda sería equivalente a un rechazo de involucrarse con los acreedores que apunta hacia su salida de la moneda común.
http://www.dw.com/es/alexis-tsipras-grecia-no-pagar%C3%A1-deuda-al-fmi/a-18550591

Lanceros de Toluca
Alto Mando
Alto Mando

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 19875
Fecha de inscripción : 25/07/2008 Edad : 96

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Defensa-M%C3%A9xico/3631280304218

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por Lanceros de Toluca el Junio 29th 2015, 20:09


La deuda militar con Francia y Alemania ahoga a Alexis Tsipras.

Sus dos socios europeos son los principales acreedores de la hipoteca contraída por Nueva Democracia y el PASOK: Grecia tiene más carros de combate que Alemania, Francia e Italia juntas, el segundo mayor gasto en Defensa de la UE y quintuplica el número de soldados por habitante de España

Nicosia, Tuesday, Feb. 3, 2015. AP

El primer ministro griego, Alexis Tsipras, frente a los soldados de la guardia de honor, durante una visita del presidente chipriota al Parlamento griego. AP
más información

A Grecia se le acaba el tiempo
Grecia cede y toca el IVA y las pensiones
El Eurogrupo se reúne de nuevo este miércoles para tratar de cerrar un acuerdo sobre Grecia

CARLOS DEL CASTILLO

@CdelCastilloM

MADRID.- Grecia se asoma a la bancarrota. El gobierno de izquierda de Syriza negocia estos días con sus socios europeos las medidas de recorte para acceder a la ayuda económica que necesita para evitar un corralito. Estos presionan al Ejecutivo heleno para que acepten una nueva subida del IVA y otro recorte de las pensiones, dos líneas rojas que su presidente, Alexis Tsipras, se comprometió con su pueblo a no traspasar. En este contexto el presidente de la Comisión Europea, el conservador Jean-Claude Juncker, sugirió que Grecia podía optar por "otros instrumentos", como "un recorte modesto en el presupuesto de Defensa".

Pese a que el resto de socios europeos han denunciado que Juncker y su equipo están intentando asumir el papel de poli bueno de las negociaciones con Tsipras y su ministro de Finanazas, Yanis Varoufakis, lo cierto es que el presidente del Ejecutivo comunitario señaló uno de los principales agujeros negros de sus cuentas: Grecia es un país altamente militarizado e invierte una enorme cantidad de su presupuesto en Defensa en proporción a su población y a su peso geopolítico.

Grecia tiene un Ejército de 109.000 soldados: 10 militares por cada 1.000 habitantes. España tiene un ratio de 2,5 y Francia, de 3,5

El pequeño país del sur de Europa tiene un Ejército de 109.000 soldados para una población de unos diez millones de habitantes. Cuenta con un ratio de unos 10 militares por cada 1.000 habitantes, de largo el mayor porcentaje de toda la Unión Europea. En comparación, España cuenta con unos 122.000 soldados, un ratio de 2,5 por cada 1.000 habitantes. Francia, una superpotencia en términos armamentísticos, de 3,5. Pero el gasto griego no solo abarca el personal.
capitan guardia de honor grecia REUTERS

Un capitan de la guardia de honor griega mira a la cámara durante un desfile militar.

En los últimos diez años —en los que se alternaron los Ejecutivos conservadores de Nueva Democracia y los socialdemócratas del PASOK— Grecia empleó una media del 4% de su PIB en Defensa, con picos de casi el 6%. La OTAN, conocida por presionar a sus aliados para que eleven el presupuesto militar, recomienda que el gasto militar alcance un 2% del PIB. El porcentaje griego solo fue superado por EEUU entre los países de la alianza. En dicho período, Grecia importó equipamiento militar por valor de 12.000 millones de euros. Entre 2005 y 2009, justo antes de verse obligada a solicitar el rescate, el país se convirtió en el quinto mayor importador de armas del mundo.


Carros alemanes y submarinos franceses

¿Dónde fue la ingente inversión de Grecia en material militar? Además de a EEUU, a sus socios europeos. Más concretamente, a dos de los principales exportadores mundiales de armas: Alemania y Francia. Grecia tiene 1620 vehículos blindados, más que Alemania, Francia e Italia juntas. Son, en su mayoría, Leopard 1 y Leopard 2, que fabrica la industria germana. En comparación, España tiene 300 unidades de Leopard, la propia Alemania, 400.

"Por un lado se le pide a Syriza que recorte en gastos de armamento, y por otro se le obliga a cumplir los pagos que tiene previstos. Es una absoluta hipocresía, denuncia Couso, eurodiputado de IU

Todo este dispendio en armamento tiene su precio. Entre las numerosas deudas entre las que nada el nuevo Ejecutivo heleno están las facturas de 4.000 millones de euros que adeuda a Alemania. Francia, que nutre la Armada griega, es la siguiente con unos 3.000 millones. "Qué paradójico. Por un lado se le está diciendo a Syriza que recorte en gastos de armamento y por otro se le obliga a cumplir los pagos que tiene previstos, no solo por los carros de combate, sino también por unos submarinos franceses por los que pagó más de 2.000 millones que además resultaron ser defectuosos por un problema de diseño. Me parece una absoluta hipocresía", denuncia el eurodiputado de IU Javier Couso en declaraciones a Público.


Leopard griego frente a Overcraft

Leopard 2 griego frente a un overcraft.

Couso, miembro de las comisiones de Seguridad y Defensa y Relaciones con la OTAN del Parlamento Europeo, señala que hay "una campaña propagandística para atacar a Syriza desde todos los flancos posibles". Tsipras espera reducir la partida de Defensa en unos 200 millones, pero le será difícil deshacerse de todo el material militar con el que cuenta Grecia. Según estimaciones de la OTAN, en 2015 el país volverá a sobrepasar los 4.000 millones de euros.

De hecho, una vez inmersos en las negociaciones del primer rescate, los gobiernos helenos se vieron obligados a seguir firmando contratos de armamento. En un arranque de sinceridad, un asistente del primer ministro griego de 2009 a 2011, Yorgos Papandréu afirmó: "Nadie nos está diciendo compren nuestros buques de guerra o no vamos a rescatarlos. Pero se desprende claramente que serán más solícitos si lo hacemos". "Sus acreedores le obligaron, junto a unos gobiernos cómplices, a comprar sin control —asevera en este punto Couso—para una defensa que no es necesaria. No puede ser que ese país tan pequeño haya tenido durante tantos años ese gasto militar tan desproporcionado".


Una "absurda" carrera armamentística con Turquía

Además de su complicada posición geoestratégica, como la frontera sur y este de Europa, una de las causas de la crisis económica en Grecia ha sido tratar de competir con Turquía en términos armamentísticos. La rivalidad entre ambos países viene de lejos y en la actualidad sigue presente con pequeñas tensiones en las aguas del Egeo, y sobre ellas. Las flotas griega y turca se lanzaban avisos continuos, mientras que los cazas violan el espacio aéreo del contrario solo para ser interceptados y escoltados al propio. Al menos, lo hacían hasta que a los griegos se les acabó el dinero para pagar el combustible.
Militarras grecia REUTERS

Una patrulla de soldados griegos guarda una bandera del país en Atenas.

Si bien en los tiempos de bonanza pocos criticaban el dispendio que suponía mantener abierta esta carrera armamentística, tras la llegada de la crisis, incluso los turcos han tendido la mano a su antiguo adversario: "Incluso los países que actualmente están tratando de ayudar a Grecia en este momento de dificultad le ofrecen comprar nuevo equipamiento militar. Grecia no necesita nuevos tanques o misiles o submarinos o aviones de combate; tampoco Turquía. Es momento de recortar en gasto militar a escala mundial, pero especialmente entre Grecia y Turquía, que no tienen ninguna necesidad de submarinos alemanes o franceses", manifestó Egemen Bağış, jefe del equipo negociador entre Ankara y la UE.

Ankara: "Incluso los países que tratan de ayudar a Grecia le ofrecen comprar nuevo equipamiento militar. Grecia no necesita submarinos alemanes o franceses, y Turquía tampoco"

"Si Grecia redujera cinco décimas su presupuesto de Defensa podría ahorrarse unos 9.000 millones de euros al año", explica Pere Ortega, director del Centro Delàs de Estudios por la Paz. Desde 2011, el país ha conseguido rebajar al 2,2% del PIB su gasto militar, que no obstante sigue siendo el más alto de la UE por detrás del Reino Unido. Para Ortega, reconocido pacifista, sigue siendo insuficiente.

"Grecia debería acabar con los conflictos históricos que mantiene con Turquía. Tiene que buscar ese camino. El otro le lleva a comprar más armas y a tener un Ejército preparado para eventuales conflictos, que son absurdos, porque los dos son socios de la OTAN", continúa Ortega, que señala que Syriza ya ha empezado a recorrer el camino para convertir a Grecia en un país neutral. "El camino para desarmarse es fácil", apunta el activista, pero no solo depende de la voluntad del Ejecutivo de Tsipras el poder recorrerlo.
http://www.publico.es/internacional/deuda-militar-francia-y-alemania.html

Lanceros de Toluca
Alto Mando
Alto Mando

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 19875
Fecha de inscripción : 25/07/2008 Edad : 96

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Defensa-M%C3%A9xico/3631280304218

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por phanter el Julio 2nd 2015, 11:07

Eurogrupo no prolongará el programa de ayuda a Grecia

El Eurogrupo no prolongará el programa de rescate a Grecia, tras el anuncio de Atenas de convocar un referéndum sobre el programa de rescate, con lo que no se materializarán las ayudas millonarias ya previstas.

El Eurogrupo no prolongará el programa de rescate a Grecia más allá del 30 de junio, tras el anuncio de Atenas de convocar un referéndum sobre el programa de rescate, con lo que no se materializarán las ayudas millonarias ya previstas para el país mediterráneo, indicaron hoy fuentes diplomáticas en Bruselas.

La reunión de los ministros de Finanzas de la zona euro en Bruselas fue interrumpida este sábado (27.06.2015) para permitir que el ministro griego de Finanzas, Yanis Varoufakis, pueda conversar por separado con el presidente del Banco Central Europeo, Mario Draghi.

Por su parte, el gobierno de Tsipras insiste en llevar a cabo el referendo planeado para el próximo cinco de julio.
De acuerdo con las informaciones existentes, proseguirán las negociaciones de los ministros de Finanzas sin Grecia. Se abordarán planes alternativos. El viernes a última hora de la noche, Atenas convocó un referéndum sobre el programa de reformas y de ahorro de los acreedores internacionales, iniciativa que recibió duras críticas por parte del Eurogrupo.
Esta situación podría llevar al fracaso definitivo de las negociaciones que ya se prolongan cinco meses entre los acreedores y la coalición del gobierno de mayoría izquierdista sobre un programa de reformas y las medidas de ahorro a emprender.
Sin un acuerdo y la correspondiente ratificación en los parlamentos de Grecia y otros países del bloque no se podrán materializar los créditos ya concedidos pero bloqueados que ascienden a 7.200 millones de euros de las instituciones europeas y el Fondo Monetario Internacional (FMI).
Además, Atenas tampoco podrá hacer uso de los casi 11.000 millones de euros que estaban reservados para preservar la estabilidad de los bancos griegos. A pesar de las arcas vacías, Atenas tendrá que pagar el 30 de junio un crédito de 1.540 millones de euros al FMI.
Ahora todo depende del Banco Central Europeo (BCE), que tendrá que decidir rápidamente si sigue prestando ayuda de emergencia a la banca griega. Aunque si el BCE cierra el grifo, la situación se agravará.

http://www.dw.com/es/eurogrupo-no-prolongar%C3%A1-el-programa-de-ayuda-a-grecia/a-18545065


avatar
phanter
Señalero
Señalero

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 965
Fecha de inscripción : 21/11/2012

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por szasi el Septiembre 12th 2015, 20:49


Germany's Tyranny Over Greece?
By Helen Roche
Posted 26th August 2015, 8:38
The philhellenist roots of the current financial crisis.
Cover of German magazine Focus, February 2010
Cover of German magazine Focus, February 2010
For centuries, Greece has held powerful sway over the German literary and cultural imagination. Now, however, the roles seem to have been cruelly reversed, with a promethean Greece bound in an ever-more arbitrary and archaic form of debt-bondage to the German fiscal giant.

To many of her inhabitants, Greece now appears to be no less under Germany's whip-hand than she had been during the Nazi occupation of the 1940s, with starvation and civil war no longer a distant memory, but a distinct possibility on an increasingly gloomy horizon. The rise of political extremism and ultra-nationalism, especially in the form of the odious Golden Dawn party, whose peculiar brand of neo-Nazi, neo-Spartan racism has raised hackles across the globe (and deep-seated fears among much of Greece's population), is seen as just one consequence of recent German financial demands. Small wonder that, in desperation, Greek politicians are grasping at historical straws, raising the spectre of reparations and German war-guilt in a futile attempt to hold back the European juggernaut which they believe is set to crush them.

But how to disentangle the complex and, currently, ineradicably poisoned relationship between these two countries, both of which are crucial to Europe's future fate? When did Germans cease to venerate Greece as a hallowed place of cultural pilgrimage, portraying her instead as an indolent liability of a country, whose ancient heritage should instantly be sold to make good her mounting debts? Ultimately, how did the intellectual and artistic 'tyranny of Greece over Germany' come to such a sad and sticky end?

Arguably, today's toxic Greco-German relationship can only be understood within a far broader historical context, drawing on an understanding of Germany's adulation and idealisation of Ancient Greece from the 18th century onwards – and her subsequent inevitable disappointment with Greece's all-too-real modern incarnation. Philhellenism was admittedly widespread in Europe during the Enlightenment and its aftermath, but many giants of German culture caught the bug particularly badly, with even such exalted figures as Goethe claiming that 'Everyone should be Greek in his own way – but he should be Greek!' Many leading German figures ultimately believed that there existed an ultra-special relationship, even a 'Wahlverwandtschaft', or a spiritual kinship, between Ancient Greece and modern Germany.

Such discourses eventually reached a peak of ideological and chauvinistic excess during the Third Reich: now the ancient Greeks were alleged to be not only spiritually, but also racially, related to the modern-day Germans – since clearly they had always been the purest of Aryan races. In Hitler's worldview, the forbears of Plato and Aristotle could easily have hailed from deepest darkest Thuringia; meanwhile, the Spartans were evidently akin to simple peasants from Schleswig-Holstein – as proved definitively by their mutual predilection for black broth(!).

In political terms, policies ranging from new Nazi inheritance laws to the Generalplan Ost, Hitler's blueprint for imperial conquest and extermination in Central Europe and Russia, were inspired by ancient Spartan practices. Thus, the idea that the Slavic peoples of the East could be termed 'Helot-peoples' slipped into popular parlance – after all, they would soon be conquered in similar fashion by the neo-Spartan warriors of the Third Reich.

Meanwhile, philhellenist propaganda was used unsparingly on the eve of the German invasion of modern Greece in 1941, in order to convince Wehrmacht soldiers to consider themselves the ancient Greeks' spiritual and biological heirs. Indeed, one could even argue that the brutality which German troops visited upon Greek civilians during World War II was in some cases a direct product of their disappointment at the modern Greeks' failure to embody that heroic ideal which they had been conditioned to expect in the inhabitants of their 'ancestral homeland'. Angela Merkel's routine portrayal as an SS-guard by the Greek press today is therefore, in some sense, a symptom of Greece's troubled relationship with Germany's philhellenist past, as well as with the memory of Nazi atrocities.

Now, however, similarly racialised views of the modern Greeks are becoming increasingly common currency amongst German politicians and pundits. Just to take one example, Berthold Seewald, Die Welt's lead cultural history editor, recently fulminated against the treacherous absurdity of 'the idea that the modern Greeks would comport themselves as descendants of Pericles or Socrates, and not as a mix of Slavs, Byzantines and Albanians' (Geschichte vor Tsipras: Griechenland zerstörte schon einmal Europas Ordnung, Die Welt, 11 June 2015). In so doing, he is merely rehearsing the thesis put forward by the 19th-century Orientalist Jakob Phillipp Fallmerayer (1790-1861), who claimed that the blood of the ancient Hellenic race had been utterly expunged from Europe by an influx of Slavic immigration, and whose theories were eagerly appropriated by leading National Socialists to explain the unenthusiastic reception given by the modern Greek population to the invading Wehrmacht.

With the situation in Greece and in Europe generally becoming increasingly volatile, and the comment on both sides increasingly vitriolic, we urgently need to reconsider these discourses as a matter of necessity – as well as properly investigating their causes, and the deeper historical context which surrounds them.

Helen Roche is Alice Tong Sze Research Fellow at Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge.
http://www.historytoday.com/helen-roche/germanys-tyranny-over-greece
avatar
szasi
Inspector [Policia Federal]
Inspector [Policia Federal]

Masculino Cantidad de envíos : 214
Fecha de inscripción : 01/06/2015

Volver arriba Ir abajo

Re: Grecia pone en problemas a la Unión europea

Mensaje por Contenido patrocinado


Contenido patrocinado


Volver arriba Ir abajo

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba

- Temas similares

 
Permisos de este foro:
No puedes responder a temas en este foro.